4 deleted 8 characters in body
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The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeing with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterreleurs vestes.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again""turned around" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeing with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeing with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné leurs vestes.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "turned around" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

3 to fix typo in "agreeing"
source | link

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeigagreeing with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeig with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeing with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right.

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

2 deleted 47 characters in body
source | link

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones are all conjugated with être, are really only that wayso when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of making the participle agreeagreeig with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, and it means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, and it means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, and it means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and you can seehas the meaning "send back" at right. 

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "return""come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones are all conjugated with être, are really only that way when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of making the participle agree with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, and it means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, and it means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, and it means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and you can see the meaning at right. The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "return" at right.

The verbs that make up what we call "Dr. Mrs. Vandertramp", the ones conjugated with être, are only so when intransitive — when there is no object.

Elle est descendue du grenier.

Elles sont sorties ce matin.

Ils sont retournés en Angleterre.

Many of these verbs can also be used in a transitive way — they can act on another object.

When that happens, there are three differences:

  1. They are conjugated with avoir instead of être.
  2. Instead of the participle agreeig with the subject, the usual rules of object agreement apply.
  3. The meaning is usually different.

Elle a descendu le coffre du grenier.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on descendu, means "brought down" instead of "came down".

Elles ont sorti leurs crayons de leurs étuis.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on sorti, means "took out" instead of "went out".

Ils ont retourné le film en Angleterre.
→ Auxiliary is avoir, no agreement on retourné, means "filmed again" instead of "returned".

You can check the different meanings in a dictionary like WordReference that gives the structure and some examples for each definition. Here's the entry for retourner. Let's compare two definitions:

retourner vtr vs. retourner vi

The first definition in the picture is labelled vtr. That means verbe transitif, so those differences apply. It's conjugated with avoir, no agreement, and has the meaning "send back" at right. 

The second definition is labelled vi for verbe intransitif. It's conjugated with être, does show agreement, and has the meaning "come back" at right.

There are actually lots of definitions for "retourner" as a transitive verb, so check out that entry!

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