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I am designing a logo for a program called

"ready-to-work" in english

AND

"emplois clé en main" en français.

In english, the logo reads "guaranteed ready-to-work by X". X is our company. So the logo is saying that someone is guaranteed ready-to-work by our company.

How would I say this en français?

  • Barely on-topic (generic translations are off-topic), though the phrasing is indeed quite delicate in this case. – Stéphane Gimenez Sep 23 '15 at 15:14
  • I’m not sure I understand the meaning of “emplois” in the name of the program or in the slogan. Does it mean “JOBS” & therefore “Turn-key/ready-to-fill JOBS” (JOBS that have gone unfilled & are ready to be filled by the first applicant) or is it an unfamiliar [to me] variation of the 2d pers/sing imperative of “hire” & therefore “HIRE [ME because I’m] ready-to-work”? It’s probably that I just don’t know all the meanings of “emplois,” but it seems that “emplois” is being used here to mean “HIRES” (as in “new hires/newly hired employees/ready-to-work HIRES”) & I’m not sure it's a correct usage. – Papa Poule Sep 23 '15 at 18:22
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    Garantis prêts à l'emploi. C'est utilisé pour toutes sortes de produits. – P. O. Sep 23 '15 at 20:11
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If you talk about people (as you clarified in your comment), I would rather use something like

directement opérationnel avec la garantie de X.

for a more fancy logo, I would dare using

garanti "prêt-à-bosser" par X

This is not "academic" french, but in this case you want to attract attention.

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    I support this as "emploi clé en main" conveys somewhat the opposite message: "Come to work, everything is ready for you to begin." What I understand you mean is: "We checked this guy and we're sure he's OK for the job." In that case, this answer is a better fit than your initial translation. – Chop Sep 24 '15 at 13:49
  • @Chop That's what I was clumsily trying to say up top in the comments, To me it seems that an "offre d'emploi" (clé en main or otherwise) could only come from the company looking to hire, whereas an "offre d'employé/e prêt/e-à-bosser" would be what X is offering/certifying. +1 for your comment and radouxju's answer – Papa Poule Sep 24 '15 at 18:38
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La dé-contraction et l'inversion de l'ordre des mots en anglais transforment la construction de la phrase

Pour définir les qualités du service, la publicité d'une société d’intérim ou de prestation de services pourrait être :

  • X vous garantit du personnel opérationnel dès le premier jour (prestataire de service au forfait journalier).

  • X vous garantit du personnel opérationnel dès la première heure (boite d'intérim pour les ouvriers).

Sinon comme slogan, le résultat de l'anglo-saxon 'ready-to-work' :

Efficace dès le début de la mission - Sté X.

Transposition

Il ne faut pas hésiter à transposer, selon la cible publicitaire : en France Prêt à l'emploi s'utilise plutôt pour des machines ou des objets publicitaires ; il y a une connotation esclavagiste lorsqu'il s'agit d'humains soumis au capitalisme.

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To keep the same general form and the program's name, I see only one phrasing (which actually sounds quite right): Emplois clé en main avec X. This avec sounds similar to “together with”.

If you'd like the text to correspond to a seal of approval logo then you should probably go for: Votre emploi clé en main garanti par X.

  • I agree that just "avec X" (with no mention of a/the guarantee) would convey the message very nicely, even in English ("[Be/Get] Ready-to-work with X") – Papa Poule Sep 23 '15 at 15:39
  • Bonjour! The logo is actually a seal of approval that someone is ready-to-work. The company guarantees this person is ready-to-work; hence, "guaranteed ready-to-work by company x". – Rabbitvillain Sep 23 '15 at 15:55
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It’s probably too late to use it as/in the name of the program, but if you don’t insist on repeating the chosen name in the slogan (and I do understand why you’d want to repeat it) I’d use “prête-à-l'emploi” for “ready-to-use/work” in the slogan to give something like:

“La solution prête-à-l'emploi, garantie par X/avec la garantie de X/avec notre garantie.”

If the program's name (or at least some of it) has to be in the slogan you could say:

“La solution clé en main, garantie par X/avec la garantie de X/avec notre garantie.”

  • Bonjour! The logo is actually a seal of approval that someone is ready-to-work. The company guarantees this person is ready-to-work; hence, "guaranteed ready-to-work by company x". – Rabbitvillain Sep 23 '15 at 15:56

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