2

A « Eh bien, juste après vous avoir quittés Camille et toi, j'ai réalisé que ... »

B « Pour quelle raison Raphaël te vient-il en aide ? »


In Sentence A, "vous" and "Camille et toi" refer to the same people. Likewise, in Sentence B, "Raphaël" and "il" refer to the same person.

I wonder why you need to refer to the same person(s) twice. Does the omission of "vous" and "il" make the sentences grammatically incorrect?


A+ « Eh bien, juste après avoir quittés Camille et toi, j'ai réalisé que ... »

B+ « Pour quelle raison te vient-Raphaël en aide ? »

  • Eh bien, juste après avoir quitté - pas de "s" pour le verbe quitter. – Vérace Feb 22 '16 at 4:05
2

For sentence A, "vous" like "nous" and "ils" are ambiguous in many languages (who count or not ? + could be polite form of the singular), so naming is for the only purpose of giving the precision. There is also the problem that you can't say "après avoir quitter toi" (or "toi et Camille") but "après t'avoir quitté", but then you are stuck if you want to add Camille, thus the result.

For sentence B, the constraint come from the interogative form forcing the "vient-il"; "vient-Raphel" is not allowed.

2

Les deux phrases sont correctes (la première nécessiterait une virgule).

correct (note: quitté sans accord) :

... juste après avoir quitté Camille et toi ...

ou (note : virgule pour marquer l'apposition Camille et toi)

... juste après vous avoir quittés , Camille et toi ...

correct (note: sans tiret après vient) :

Pour quelle raison te vient Raphaël en aide ?

ou (forme affirmative):

Pour quelle raison Raphaël te vient en aide ?

ou (forme avec est-ce que):

Pour quelle raison est-ce que Raphaël te vient en aide ?

ou, quand le sujet est un substantif (ou un nom), on peut le garder en début de phrase et ajouter un pronom personnel sujet inversé après le verbe:

Pour quelle raison Raphaël te vient-il en aide ?

  • Merci. Je voudrais savoir pourquoi il faut utiliser "quitté" au lieu de "quittés" dans la phrase "juste après avoir quitté Camille et toi". Contrairement à "juste après vous avoir quittés, Camille et toi". – pourrait Peut-être Feb 21 '16 at 4:47
  • 1
    @pourraitpuet-etre : quitté ne s'accorde avec le COD (vous=Camille et toi) que si celui-ci est placé avant. – guillaume girod-vitouchkina Feb 21 '16 at 9:07
  • "Juste après avoir quitté Camille et toi" will never be used, because of the "toi". If it was other persons, You could use it for example : "Juste après avoir quitté Camille et Marc." It really doesn't sound right. Same for "Pour quelle raison te vient Raphaël en aide ?" The subject is not inverted in this case. – MakorDal Feb 22 '16 at 8:24
1

The French are all about redundant emphasis when it comes to pronouns. I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "Moi, je préfère le vin rouge moi," or something like that.

In your examples,

A uses "vous" for emphasis, and

B needs the "il" because the question doesn't have "est-ce que" and needs the inverted subject-verb combination.

  • ""Moi, je préfère le vin rouge, moi" is not a correct way of saying things. In the first phrase, it's not "Vous" that is used for emphasis, it's "Camille et toi". When you say "vous" the person you are talking to is supposed to know who your are talking about : he was there. – MakorDal Feb 22 '16 at 8:20
1

In your first exemple, you could use the "vous" directly and omit the names of the people : those are there for emphasis. The person you are talking to was there and know what and who you are talking about. « Eh bien, juste après vous avoir quittés, j'ai réalisé que ... »

The second sentence is a bit more tricky but is more or less the same. « Pour quelle raison te vient-il en aide ? » and « Pour quelle raison Raphaël te vient en aide ? » are both right, though the second is more coloquial. In the first case, you omit the persones name because your interlocutor knows who you are talking about. In the second case, you omit "il" because you don't care about it.

« Eh bien, juste après avoir quittés Camille et toi, j'ai réalisé que ... » and « Pour quelle raison te vient Raphaël en aide ? » are not correct.

In both your sentences the names are used for emphasis or to give more detail about who you are talking about.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.