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These two interjections seem to carry the meaning of "well" in English, but I wonder if they have nuances of meaning or such?

Ma foi, je dois dire que j'ai eu mon lot d'aventures pour la journée.

Eh bien, je dois dire que j'ai eu mon lot d'aventures pour la journée.

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    No difference as far as I know. You can even say: 'Eh bien ma foi, je dois dire que j'ai eu mon lot d'aventures pour la journée.' – Destal Jul 2 '16 at 8:32
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No difference in meaning, however I think "ma foi" is less broadly used. I tend to think that it's because literally, it refers to the speaker's religion, which areligious people don't have much use for, and which some religious people find distasteful; but can offer no source to vouch for this other than my own personal experience.

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    I think "Ma foi" is only used near Marseille... (and people who moved from there) – Random Jul 2 '16 at 9:50
  • @Random: And Toulouse. Le midi. – Drew Jul 4 '16 at 16:51
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Ma foi also seems to be used exclusively by older people, 60+. I've never heard a teen say it, or even anyone middle aged.

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    On Marseille/Aix-en-provence, it is very common :) – Random Jul 2 '16 at 11:57
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It doesn't really help but you can also say both at once like:

"Eh bien ma foi, ce fut une bonne journée."

Nevertheless that's more formal speech.

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