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{ The repetition of the same verb }

You’re lucky that I found you when I did.

Tu as eu de la chance que je t'aie trouvé quand je t'ai trouvé.

In English, you’ll never say: "You’re lucky that I found you when I found you", since this kind of repetition is shunned. So I suppose that my suggested French sentence above needs to be altered accordingly, though I’m not sure how.

The same goes for the following:

Thank you so much for coming with us as far as you did. {You never say "as far as you came"}

Un grand merci pour nous avoir accompagnés aussi loin que... ???

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As it is obvious you found someone precisely when you found someone, there might be no reason to add this detail so you might then simply say:

Tu as eu de la chance que je t'aie trouvé(e).

If what you mean is the time you found him is important, you can say:

Tu as eu de la chance que je t'aie trouvé(e) à ce moment là.

Tu as eu de la chance que je t'aie trouvé(e) au bon moment.

About the second sentence, here are some suggestions:

Un grand merci pour nous avoir accompagnés jusque-là.

Un grand merci pour nous avoir accompagnés à ce point.

Un grand merci pour nous avoir autant accompagnés.

Un grand merci pour nous avoir accompagnés autant que vous avez pu le faire.

  • To @jlliagre How do the following sentences sound? Do they still come across as redundant? Merci. "Tu as eu de la chance que je t'aie trouvé quand je l'ai fait." "Un grand merci pour nous avoir accompagnés aussi loin que vous l'avez fait." – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 2 '16 at 16:12
  • The first sentence is very unlikely to be used by a native French speaker. It might be misunderstood to mean "You are lucky that I found you when I did something (else)". The second one is all right. – jlliagre Aug 2 '16 at 21:12

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