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I found this in a French Facebook page:

Les vrais amis sont les gens rares demandent de vos nouvelles et se soucient vraiment de la réponse.

Why does the "les gens rares" go immediately to a conjugated verb without a "qui"? Could someone help me understand this sentence?

I'd translate it literally as:

Real friends are the few people ask about your news and really worry about the response.

Shouldn't the "demandent" be "qui demandent" or "demandant"?

Also why is there a "de" that follows after the "demandent"? Shouldn't it just be "demandent vos nouvelles"?

closed as off-topic by Stéphane Gimenez Aug 20 '16 at 9:14

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    You are right. It should be "qui demandent". "Demandant" is also possible but it requires that you also change "se soucient" into "se souciant". – SteffX Aug 19 '16 at 17:13
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about a typo, not about French. You can ask such questions in the chat instead. – Stéphane Gimenez Aug 20 '16 at 9:14
  • Sorry, I thought it was a grammar rule that I hadn't known prior – Marco Ruben Abuyuan Llanes Aug 20 '16 at 9:15
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There is indeed a missing qui in this sentence.

Les vrais amis sont les gens rares qui demandent de vos nouvelles et se soucient vraiment de la réponse.

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