3

Both "rien que ..." and "ne ... que" translates into "just/only". But I can’t help feeling that their usages are somewhat different.

I’ve just come up with the example sentences below for the sake of contrasting these two similar-looking phrases. Am I interpreting the difference correctly? Do those sentences make sense?


S'ils m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus, j'aurais pu finir toutes les tâches. (Mais malheureusement, je n'y suis pas arrivée parce qu'en fait je n'ai eu presque aucun temps.)

If (only) they had given me just one more minute, I could’ve completed all the tasks.


S'ils ne m'avaient laissé qu'une minute de plus, je n'aurais pas pu finir toutes les tâches. (Mais heureusement que j'y suis arrivée parce qu'en fait ils m'ont laissé dix minutes de plus.)

If they hadn’t given me more than a minute, I couldn’t have completed all of the tasks.

  • 4
    « S'ils ne m'avaient laissé qu'une minute de plus » could be written : « S'ils ne m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus ». « Rien » here insists on the fact just only one minute would has been sufficient… Compare to "if they had given me one minute more" and "if they had given me just one minute more"… – Stéphane Aug 27 '16 at 19:51
1

Bonjour ! Dans votre contexte, on ne peut pas dire de manière correcte "rien que", mais "ne ... rien que". "S'ils ne m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus,...". En revanche rien que peut s'utiliser dans "Rien que cela aurait pu suffire " --> "Just this would have sufficed"

En espérant vous avoir aidée, désolé pour ma traduction approximative.

  • 1
    Pourquoi ? Qu'est-ce que tu as contre « s'ils m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus » ? – Gilles Sep 25 '16 at 21:39
  • 1
    @Gilles - "s'ils m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus" est vulgaire. La forme correcte est "s'ils ne m'avaient laissé rien qu'une minute de plus". – Frank Feb 4 '17 at 2:08
0

I feel the two sentences say about the same thing, the first one maybe conveying more insistence on "just a little minute", but the first one feels "vulgar" to me, i.e. grammatically broken, because it lacks that ne to make the negation of the verb complete. No doubt you will hear it in the streets. But I hope it's yet not taught in schools.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.