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My try: Il faut avoir l'avis de quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté que vous.

I’m stuck on how to express the idea:

someone as wise and experienced as you

OR more literally: someone as wise as they are experienced (as you)

because two different ideas are involved and compared here:

quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté

AND: quelqu'un d'aussi avisé{expérimenté} que vous

I’m not sure how to get around this duality problem and express the idea naturally in French. I think that my sentence needs some improvement.


UPDATE:

The use of "et" between "avisé" and "expérimenté" would solve the problem nicely. What I want to find out here, though: What if you start your sentence saying "quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté" and then need to add the second idea "quelqu'un d'aussi avisé{expérimenté} que vous" as an afterthought? Using two "que"s like this sounds clumsy, I suppose.

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    Why do you want to use "que" ? You said in english "someone as wise and experienced as you", which implies an "et", which would be fine in french. Personnaly, I wouldn't understand your 2nd english sentence: "someone as wise as they are experienced as you". Is this structure natural in english ? – Random Sep 9 '16 at 11:49
  • @R: Yes, the use of "et" would solve the problem nicely. What I want to find out here, though: What if you start your sentence saying "quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté" and then need to add the second idea "quelqu'un d'aussi avisé que vous" as an afterthought? Using two "que"s like this sounds clumsy, I suppose. Merci. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Sep 9 '16 at 11:59
  • @R: On a side note, regarding my phrasing "someone as wise as they are experienced (as you)", I used this phrase solely for the purpose of providing a literal translation. So it doesn't sound natural, but this structure does exists. You might want to check out the following page for further details. Merci. english.stackexchange.com/questions/105634/as-as-vs-as-much-as – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Sep 9 '16 at 12:07
  • Your first comment is interesting, I think you should add it to your question ;) – Random Sep 9 '16 at 12:29
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    @Luna I'm a native English speaker. "Luna is as wise as she is experienced" is a perfectly fine sentence and doesn't sound unnatural (to me). However, "Luna is as wise as she is experienced as you" sounds incorrect, and the cited EL&U question doesn't seem to indicate otherwise. – arbitrarystringofletters Sep 9 '16 at 13:02
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I think that "quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté, tel que vous" expresses well your english sentence "someone as wise as they are experienced as you".

  • I'd rather translate : "someone as wise as experimented, such as you". I don't understand why "…they are experienced…" in your translation ?? – Stéphane Sep 9 '16 at 19:13
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    @Stéphane : The user wanted a french translation for his english sentence. The part "..they are experienced..." is part of his original sentence. – Rodjf Sep 12 '17 at 8:58
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« Quelqu’un d’aussi avisé et expérimenté que vous/toi » → "someone as wise and experienced as you"

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With your update about this being added as an afterthought in mind, I think you could start with the cool notion of “someone being just as wise as they are experienced” (which, imo, goes beyond “being wise and experienced” [although please note that the comparison form could be used sarcastically/negatively to imply that someone’s lack of wisdom is equally matched by their lack of experience]) just as you’ve proposed (without the “que vous”) and follow it with @Stéphane 's good “as wise and experienced as you” version in its entirety, which would not only avoid the "clumsy" and unclear second “que” in one phrase but it would also help clarify that you’re not being negative or sarcastic with the first phrase:

« Il faut avoir l'avis de quelqu'un d'aussi avisé qu'expérimenté … c'est-à-dire/autrement dit quelqu’un d’aussi avisé et expérimenté que vous ».

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