1

There are some forbidden French liaison rules:

Before & After Full Names: Albert est
After et: et une de plus
Before onze: il y avait onze
Before oui: on a dit “oui”
After Plural Nouns: les arbres en fleurs
Before the letter a: Je vais à Paris
After Singular Nouns: la maison est
Before H aspiré: en haut

Like for "onze" and "oui", is a liaison before "au" also forbidden?

  • 7
    Where did you get those rules from? Liaisons after plural nouns, before the letter a are not forbidden. Liaison before au is not among the forbidden liaisons either. Les arbres‿ en fleurs, je vais‿ à la gare, je vais‿ au marché, are optional liaisons. For more read this article on wikipedia. – Laure SO - Écoute-nous Sep 19 '16 at 11:23
  • /ʒəvɛz‿aʁijo dəʒanɛʁo/ ;-) – jlliagre Sep 19 '16 at 12:48
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    I find that this webpage does a great job explaining which liaisons are mandatory and which are frowned upon or forbidden. Liaisons are not forbidden after plural nouns or before the letter a. – Alexandre d'Entraigues Sep 19 '16 at 14:17
4

As others have indicated in comments, many of the rules you cite are wrong. The Wikipedia article is reliable.

Before & After Full Names: Albert est
After et: et une de plus

These two are correct.

Before onze: il y avait onze

This is correct, but I would generalize the rule to “no liaison before numerals”. For example “cent un” is pronounced [sɑ̃.œ̃] (no liaison). Contrast the use of un as a common noun: “les uns et les autres” (“the ones and the others”) [le.z‿œ̃.e.le.z‿otʁ].

After Singular Nouns: la maison est

This is correct. Une liaison interdite, des liaisons (-z-) autorisées.

Before oui: on a dit “oui”
Before H aspiré: en haut

That's technically correct, but a more useful way to think about these words is to consider that they do not start with a vowel sound: they start with a silent consonant (the “H aspiré”). For example the definite article is not elided: “*le oui et le non”, “le haut”. If the word doesn't start with a vowel, there's no opportunity for a liaison.

After Plural Nouns: les arbres en fleurs
Before the letter a: Je vais à Paris

These are completely wrong. In both cases, the liaison is optional. I'd do it in formal speech or in poetry, and omit it in everyday speech. There's no difference between à and au in this respect: “je vais au travail” has an optional liaison.

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