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1A : Je t'ai souri et tu t'es évanouie comme si j'étais un fantôme.

1B : Tu me regardes comme si j'étais un fantôme.


2A : Je t'ai souri et tu t'es évanouie comme si tu avais vu un fantôme.

2B : Tu me regardes comme si tu avais vu un fantôme.


The main clause in 1A and 2A is in the past tense, while the main clause in 1B and 2B is in the present. Despite the use of the different tenses in the main clause, the tense in a « comme si » clause should be the same in each of the two examples, I suppose?

I wonder if the tense in a « comme si » clause should always be the Imparfait or the Plus-que-parfait, no matter which tense is used in the main clause?

The phrase « comme si » serves to introduce un unlikely hypothetical situation, so it must have something to do with the fact that the present tense should not used in a « comme si » clause.

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You're right, 'comme si' implies imparfait or plus-que-parfait no matter the tense in the main clause. Those two tenses are used to define an event that can't be precisely dated, in that case an hypothesis.

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