2

1 : Pour une fois, je me sens d'attaque pour aller à la gym.

2 : Pour une fois que je me sens d'attaque pour aller à la gym.

The 1st and 2nd sentences both mean "I feel inclined to go to the gym for a change / for once", indicating that something unusual is happening now, correct?

3 : Pour une fois que je me sens d'attaque pour aller à la gym, il se met d'un coup à tomber des cordes !

On the other hand, if you add a punchline (in italics) to the 2nd sentence, does the 3rd sentence mean:

= "The one time I feel inclined to go to the gym, it suddenly starts pouring down!"

= "When I feel inclined to go to the gym for once, it suddenly starts pouring down!"

It seems that in the 3rd sentence, « pour une fois » not only expresses the idea of "for a change / for once", but also serves as a conjunction similar to "when" in order to introduce a punchline in the main clause.

  • Yes, if you add that bit at the end, it becomes the one time x, y happens. – Lambie Nov 28 '16 at 18:26
6

Well, you’re right and wrong.

Actually the 2nd sentence is waiting for something, for a punchline as you say. You may well say it without the punchline, but then it should be implied by the context. If the context does not give enough clue as to what that punchline could be, people will ask for it, eyebrows raised, puzzled look or even say « Et quoi ? Alors ? »

« Pour une fois que je me sens d'attaque pour aller à la gym… », dit-il en regardant de sa fenêtre l’averse tomber.

« On va manger sur la terrasse ? Pour une fois qu’il fait beau ! »

In these two examples, the context gives enough clue.

  • So do you need to use a comma instead of "que" if you intend to mean "I feel inclined to go to the gym for a change / for once"? Merci. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Nov 29 '16 at 23:32
  • 1
    Yes, that's right. Note that it is the same in english “For once, I’ll take some wine.”, « Pour une fois, je prendrai du vin. » as opposed to “I’ll take some wine for once.”, « Je prendrai du vin pour une fois. » - No comma when pour une fois/for once when it is postposed. But « pour une fois que » can come back in this kind of construct « Je prendrai du vin, pour une fois qu’il y en a !». Here the comma is expected, the first part of the sentence is the context for the « pour une fois qu’il y en a ». – Sxilderik Nov 29 '16 at 23:43
  • Merci. So I think I need to consider "pour une fois que" as a conjunction rather than an adverbial phrase, just as "une fois que" is a conjunction. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Nov 29 '16 at 23:49
  • A remarkable explanation, by the way! Merci. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Nov 29 '16 at 23:51
  • You’re very much welcome! – Sxilderik Nov 29 '16 at 23:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.