1

Does this phrase want to say "Tu parais plus sûr de toi que d’habitude"? Or "Tu parais plus sûr de toi que tu l’as jamais été"? I think this phrase is for emphasis, but I don’t understand it perfectly.

  • Tu parais plus sûr de toi que jamais.
3

It means "more than ever".

Both "never" and "ever" translate to "jamais" in French. It can sound weird when it's use positively like "ever", and it's not very casual, but it's correct. For example you can hear (or mostly read) "A-t-on jamais vu ...", meaning a general "have we ever seen..."/"has anyone ever seen...*". It's really dated though.

But "plus ... que jamais" is still pretty common.

  • So "Tu parais plus sûr de toi que tu l’as jamais été"? is the longer version of meaning the same thing? – Merissa Dec 7 '16 at 14:10
  • Yes, sorry I should have said it clearly. The longer version is pretty heavy so it's not used a lot. It's also less formal, so in books they'll use the other one because it sounds better, and orally we'll often use the shortest option. – Teleporting Goat Dec 7 '16 at 16:04
1

"Tu parais plus sûr de toi que tu l’as jamais été"? It means "more than ever"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.