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In the sentence below, does "la" refer to "un sorte" or "onde"?

  • Ce truc génère une sorte d’onde de choc. La colombe peut la ressentir.
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In a metter of meaning, it refers to both, actually. You can't separate "une sorte" and "onde". La refers to "une sorte d'onde de choc", it wouldn't make sense to refer to "une sorte".

But grammatically, it does refer to "onde", as it would be "le" with a masculine noun.

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    But if "onde" were a masculine noun, would I need to say "le ressentir", referring to the masculine "onde", or need to say "la ressentir", referring to "une sorte"? This is just hypothetical, but in this case I would need to pick "le" or "la". – Merissa Dec 16 '16 at 12:54
  • Ooh ok, I get your question. I didn't get your question at first, because it makes no sense to refer to "une sorte". But yes, the pronoun agrees to the second noun, so you'd say "une sorte de sandwich ... le manger". – Teleporting Goat Dec 16 '16 at 13:04
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la refers to onde de choc

La colombe peut ressentir l'onde de choc.

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La refers to onde de choc and agrees in gender with it.

Should a masculine substantive had be used, le would have been required, e.g.:

Ce truc génère une sorte de tremblement. La colombe peut le ressentir

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