0

1 : Ne pourrions-nous pas boire simplement un verre entre amis sans chamaillerie pour une fois ?

I assume that the « simplement » in the 1st sentence refers to the simple act of having a friendly drink. But I wonder how the meaning of the sentence will change if « simplement » is placed at different positions?

2 : Ne pourrions-nous pas simplement boire un verre entre amis sans chamaillerie pour une fois ?

3 : Ne pourrions-nous simplement pas boire un verre entre amis sans chamaillerie pour une fois ?

1

La deuxième formulation n'est pas bonne.

Forme correcte: Ne pourrions-nous pas simplement boire un verre.

In "Ne pourrions-nous pas", "pas" can't be separate from "Ne pourrions-nous".

Ex:

Ne peux-tu pas écrire bien lisiblement ?= correct.
Ne peux-tu bien lisiblement pas écrire ? = incorrect.
Ne peux-tu demain pas écrire ? = incorrect.
Ne peux-tu pas écrire demain ? = correct.
Ne travaille demain pas = incorrect.
Ne travaille pas demain = correct.

Conclusion: on ne peut pas séparer pas "pas" est le verbe dont il est la négation.

  • Le sens de "simplement".

Ici: sous-entendu sans se disputer: en prenant seulement un verre, sans se disputer.

Avec le fait de prendre un verre seulement = seule activité.
Se disputer = activité qui n'est pas au programme.

1

1) could mean that the locutor wants as simpler way to drink (just pour the wine, and skip the ritual...). However the rest of the sentence ("... sans chamaillerie ...") gives it the same meaning as 2)

2) is the canonical form if you want to restrict the action to drinking and avoid the bickering.

3) doesn't sound correct.

If you replace "simplement" by "uniquement" the effect of the position is more noticeable.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.