3

Est-on obligé de faire cet exercice ?

What can the response be, from among the following?

(a) Oui, on en est obligé.

(b) Oui, on y est obligé.

(c) Oui, on l'est obligé.

(d) Oui, on est obligé.

Since the phrase is être obligé de faire quelque chose, the temptation would be to use en. But I'm not sure whether de is part of the verb or not; if not we would have to use le. On the other hand there is also the phrase obligé quelqu'un à quelque chose, but I don't think it applies in this case.

  • 1
    Your answers are not right: Est-on obligé [adjective] de faire cet exercice? Oui, on est obligé de le faire. The pronouns here come after the DE or à: It replaces: faire l'exercise. – Lambie Jan 11 '17 at 22:57
  • You need to provide the antecedents. The current question does not contain enough detail. In any case, I pretty much answer your question. – Lambie Jan 14 '17 at 17:00
5
+50

The question is:

Which ones of these pronouns, y, en, le, or "no pronoun" can replace de le faire in

– On xx est pas obligé.


The verb dictates the pronoun to use. To find which one is expected, we shouldn't look at the question but instead know how would be written its full answer (without the pronoun).


With:

Est-on obligé(s) de faire cet exercice ?

A full answer would be:

Oui, on nous oblige à le faire.

As the grammar books tell, y replaces à so the right answer is

Oui, on y est obligé(s).

Same would happen with other past participle like contraint / astreint / autorisé à le faire.

The alternate implicit reference with no pronoun is also possible, although informal:

Oui, on est obligé(s).


On the other hand, if we use a different set of past participles:

Est-on dispensé(s) de faire cet exercice ?

A full answer would be:

Oui, on nous dispense de le faire.

The grammar books tells en replaces de so the right answer is

Oui, on en est dispensé(s). (or still the informal oui, on est dispensé(s))

Same with exonérés, privés, empêchés, capables although with the latter, the full answer would be:

Oui, on est capables de le faire. because capables is not a past participle.


In both case, le is also possible, but only if replacing the whole clause:

Oui, on l'est.


Off topic: On can replace any personal pronoun, including "people in general, anyone" (pronom indéfini) and a defined group of people including me (pronom défini).

In the first case, i.e. "whoever susceptible to do it", the singular must be used. e.g. En France, on est obligé d'avoir 18 ans pour voter.

In the last case, i.e. "we, the students enrolled in that class", the plural can logically be used. e.g. Nous, les élèves de 4e II, on est obligés de faire cet exercice*.

Oddly enough, the plural is still not mandatory here, unlike the feminine which is required when the group in exclusively female. e.g. Alors les filles, on est grande(s) maintenant !.

  • 1
    Could you please explain why the "s" is needed in "obligés" even though the pronoun "on" is singular? Also, why is "y" the correct pronoun despite "obligé de"? – user11550 Jan 12 '17 at 2:43
  • 1
    @user11550: The s is not needed in this case. It's better to leave it out actually. – Stéphane Gimenez Jan 12 '17 at 14:00
  • @jlliagre Est-on obligé de manger ce sucre? Oui, on est obligé d'en manger. Voilà ce qui manque et voilà ce qui peut prêter à confusion. Je ne comprends pas le refus des francophones ici de voir cette confusion éventuelle dans l'esprit d'un locuteur non-natif. Evidemment, le phrase a) ne marche pas. Je suis d'accord avec vous. – Lambie Jan 14 '17 at 17:04
  • user11550, On can replace any personal pronoun, including "people in general, anyone" (pronom indéfini) and a defined group of people including me (pronom défini). I was assuming the last case, i.e. "we, the students enrolled in that class" in which case the plural can logically be used. Oddly enough, the plural is still not mandatory unlike the feminine which is required when the group in exclusively female: On est belle(s). – jlliagre Jan 14 '17 at 20:59
  • @Lambie Est-on obligé de manger ce sucre? Oui, on est obligé d'en manger. is correct but Oui, on y est obligé too. I might be missing your point so can you elaborate about the confusion you believe francophones are refusing to see? – jlliagre Jan 14 '17 at 21:08
1

La bizarrerie tient moins à l'infélicité de en qu'à l'apparition de de dans la forme passive à la place du à à l'actif.

Est-on obligé de faire cet exercice ?
Qui vous oblige à faire cet exercice ?

La pronominalisation de l'actif en y est une des deux possibilités pour un complément en à :

Jean parle à Marie => Jean lui parle
Jean pense à Marie => Jean y pense

Ce qui donne avec la phrase en question :

Qui vous y oblige ?

En mettant le tout au passif :

On y est obligé (par le prof).

Une question complémentaire serait donc l'origine du de dans la forme sans pronominalisation.

0

The question

Est-on obligé de faire cet exercice ?

Can be answered with:

(a) Oui, on en est obligé. - NO

(b) Oui, on y est obligé. - YES

(c) Oui, on l'est obligé. - NO

(d) Oui, on est obligé. - YES

(e) Oui, on est obligé de le faire.

My favorites would be, in order of preference (d) and (e). (b) is still correct, but sounds "funny" to me.

0

The verbe obliger involves the preposition à when you're forcing someone to do something. De rather comes when it's an impersonal obligation. Now notice:


Être persuadé de X. --> J'en suis persuadé.

Être heureux de X. --> En être heureux.

Être capable de X. --> Il en est capable.

In all of thoses cases you can form a sentence with en because of the preposition de. But have a look on the grammatical nature of X. It can be either a verb or a noun. Yet when you say "Obligé de X", X cannot be a noun, only a verb. And it's not possible to say "En être obligé". I don't know if that is the explanation to your point but there's likely a correlation. Actually, when constructing the sentence with "obliger",it's intuitive to use à: compare with English "to be assigned to something ", whose meaning is close. But anyway that's most likely an exception because 95% of the time you'll use en when you see de.

-2

It depends on what comes after the DE.

Examples: obliger de faire ses devoirs: obliger de les faire;

obliger de faire la vaiselle: obliger de la faire.

obliger d'aller à l'école: obliger d'y aller;

obliger de bouffer du pain; obliger d'en bouffer.

Tout dépend de ce qui vient après. Si c'est un partitif (obliger de verbe + du pain, de la marmelade, du sucre, faire du bateau) manger du gateau, boire de la limonade, utiliser du sucre, le pronom EN est de rigueur.

Obliger d'en [verb] manger, boire, utiliser, etc.

I did not conjugate the verb obliger to keep it simple. On n'est pas obligé de le faire.

The possibilities are: les, la, le, y and en

Here's a more complicated one:

On est obligé de lui donner beaucoup d'argent toutes les semaines. That's with an indirect object + a "partitif".

On est obligé de lui en donner beaucoup toutes les semaines.

Or this one: obliger de le voir au travail et non pas chez lui;

Which becomes: obliger de l'y voir. So, it can get hairy though this one is not very usual.

Bear in mind the idiom: obliger de s'y faire: to have to accept some situation or other.

  • It is not clear how you are answering to the question, i.e. telling which suggestions of the list are correct or not, and why. – jlliagre Jan 11 '17 at 22:31
  • @jlliagre You must be kidding. Est-on obligé à faire cet exercice? Non, rien n'y oblige. – Lambie Jan 11 '17 at 22:50
  • 1
    Do you mean the question need to use obligé à faire or is it just a typo? – jlliagre Jan 11 '17 at 23:07
  • Also, we say "tu m'obliges a le faire?", not "tu m'obliges de le faire". – Frank Jan 13 '17 at 15:30
  • On est obligé de le faire. I did not say: "Tu m'obliges" de le faire, did I??? I said: être obliger de faire quelque chose without any indirect object. Of course, obliger quelqu'un à faire quelque chose. parler-francais.eklablog.com/obliger-a-de-a46980829 – Lambie Jan 14 '17 at 16:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.