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A: Quelles sont les raisons pour lesquelles on devrait aller au concert ce soir ?

B: Les raisons sont que la chanteuse est magnifique et qu'il va faire beau ce soir.

In this question, it was indicated in the answers that "Les raisons sont que" is not too natural. If so, what would be a natural way to answer this question? Answering with "Parce que ..." doesn't seem natural either if the question is posed this way, does it?

Similarly:

A: Quels sont les avantages de faire de l'exercice tous les jours ?

B: Les avantages sont qu'on ne va pas tomber malade facilement et qu'on peut développer ses muscles.

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I think I was the one arguing that "les raisons que" is too heavy for everyday conversation, although perfectly correct, and that after asking to other native French speakers. Something more natural in my opinion would be:

A: Quelles sont les raisons pour lesquelles on devrait aller au concert ce soir ?

B: (Parce que) la chanteuse est magnifique et il va faire beau ce soir.

And I would say that the "parce que" is even optional (it is more or less obvious that you are giving your reasons to go). I think that answer would be accepted in writing too.

Same thing pour "les avantages", it is too heavy/complicated/school-ish for everyday conversation. More natural would be:

A: Quels sont les avantages de faire de l'exercice tous les jours ?

B: On ne va pas tomber malade facilement et on peut développer ses muscles.

But "on ne va pas tomber malade facilement" is this time a bit funny :-) I would say:

A: Quels sont les avantages de faire de l'exercice tous les jours?

B: Pour la santé et pour les muscles.

which is too elliptical probably... Let's say:

A: A quoi ca sert de faire de l'exercice tous les jours?

B: Ca aide pour la santé et les muscles.

This one sounds now quite natural in familiar conversation.

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  • Ok sure, I get your point if this is everyday conversation. What if it's formal writing? – user11550 Jan 16 '17 at 16:07
  • You can use "les raisons sont que..." for formal writing, but it sounds like you are doing a mechanical exercise :-) nothing wrong, but a native author of a book might not say that. He might just write: "la chanteuse est magnifique et qu'il va faire beau ce soir." - I think that would completely work in writing. – Frank Jan 16 '17 at 16:14
  • If you just write "la chanteuse est magnifique et qu'il va faire beau ce soir.", shouldn't you leave out the "que" in "qu'il"? – user11550 Jan 16 '17 at 18:51
  • Yes, you are right actually, and I took it out from my answer. – Frank Jan 16 '17 at 19:29

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