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I wonder if there's a good translation in English for the phrase "et encore,...".
It is a very common French phrase used mostly in "[This bad thing happened] et encore [if it hadn't been for this other thing, it would have worse]

Il a dû payer 200 euros de réparations de voiture, et encore, il a eu une remise.
He had to pay 200 euros to repair his car, [et encore] he had a discount

Elle est arrivée vingt minutes en retard, et encore, elle a trouvé tout de suite la salle de réunion.
She arrived twenty minutes late [et encore] she found the meeting room straight away

It is maybe not very formal.

closed as off-topic by Frank, Laure, Toto, jlliagre, Stéphane Gimenez Jan 24 '17 at 20:26

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    I would say "and even then", but I think it's a question more fitted for the English SO : english.stackexchange.com. – Jylo Jan 24 '17 at 14:40
  • A very common French phrase. Fyi, we don't say locution. Le CNTRL dit ceci: [Encore, marque de l'affirmation sous réserve; et encore! corrige l'énoncé précédent en indiquant avec une certaine véhémence, qu'après réflexion, on constate qu'il n'est conforme à la vérité que jusqu'à un certain point (ce que justifie gén. la suite du discours). That is one use. Is that the one you mean in the two sentences? However, your first would be: A bad thing happened and it could have been worse. Et encore at the end. – Lambie Jan 24 '17 at 15:19
  • Yes, sorry about the mistakes you pointed out in my question, I will edit it ! Does the english.stackexchange.com handle such translation questions ? – Soltius Jan 24 '17 at 15:26
  • I think the definition you propose is close to what I mean even if it's not exactly it. In my examples sentences, there's not really the idea of "'après réflexion, on constate qu'il n'est conforme à la vérité que jusqu'à un certain point". The first part of the sentence is completely true, not "jusqu'à un certain point". – Soltius Jan 24 '17 at 15:30
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it seems OP is asking for the correctness of a sentence in English, so it should be asked on English Language and Usage, not French Language. – Laure Jan 24 '17 at 16:54
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The general sens of "et encore" in a sentence is to mark opposition in an "ironic way" to the general idea of the text. In your example:

Il a dû payer 200 euros de réparations de voiture, et encore, il a eu une remise.

The general idea is high cost of repairs (200 euros), but "et encore" marks opposition to this idea (remise=discount). So if I'm asked to translate your example I say:

He had to pay 200 euros to repair his car, in spite of the discount

To my knowledge, "in spite of" marks here the opposition in question.

Your second example describes the same principle of "et encore" use.

  • Sorry, but /despite he had a discount/ is not grammatical in English. Did you mean: /and despite that he still got a discount/? – Lambie Jan 24 '17 at 16:23
  • Yes, it's what I mean since it marks "opposition". – sapienz Jan 24 '17 at 16:26
  • That would be /even so/. – Lambie Jan 24 '17 at 16:26
  • I think "even so" is better, I will edit my answer with your "even so" suggestion – sapienz Jan 24 '17 at 16:29

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