1

This question is on the sentence form expressing a mental attitude (such hope, fear, or doubt) using a subjunctive in the que-clause, e.g.:

Je suis heureuse que tu sois ici.

QUESTION

Am I right to think that the combination of the verb of attitude in the indicatif présent and the verb within the que-clause in subjonctif imparfait would never occur? One example would be:

Je suis heureuse que tu fusses ici.

I suppose if a form of sentence never occurs, we may call it ungrammatical.

BACKGROUND

I am going to set out the reasoning process by which I arrived at the expectation above (viz. never) so you know what's motivating my question and could show me where I've gone wrong if I did.

The reasoning: The que-clause will be either a proposition contemporary with the attitude or anterior to it (let us ignore the future things).

If contemporary at present, we get indicatif présent and subjonctif présent:

Je suis heureuse que tu sois ici.

One day later, the attitude and the proposition will have become contemporary and past. For the attitude we use a form of indicative past (either passé simple or passé composé), and for the proposition either subjonctif imparfait in formal writing or subjonctif présent in conversation. Thus:

Je fus heureuse que tu fusses ici.
Je fus heureuse que tu sois ici.
J'ai été heureuse que tu fusses ici.
J'ai été heureuse que tu sois ici.

Otherwise, the proposition is anterior to the attitude.

If the attitude is in the present, then for the anterior proposition we use subjonctif passé:

Je suis heureuse que tu aies été ici.

One day later, the attitude will be in the past and the proposition in an anterior (more remote) past. For the attitude we use a form of indicative past, and for the proposition subjonctif plus-que-parfait in formal writing or subjonctif passé in conversation.

Je fus heureuse que tu eusses été ici.
Je fus heureuse que tu aies été ici.
J'ai été heureuse que tu eusses été ici.
J'ai été heureuse que tu aies été ici.

In none of these did we ever need the combination of indicatif présent and subjonctif imparfait:

Je suis heureuse que tu fusses ici.

  • What do you do if you are (now) happy that the person has been here (in the past)? – Frank Jan 26 '17 at 2:52
  • @Frank. Isn't that just Je suis heureuse que tu aies été ici? – Catomic Jan 26 '17 at 3:01
  • I think so :-) I think that works. – Frank Jan 26 '17 at 3:24
1

I found a rule that says:

Quand on emploie le subjonctif plus-que-parfait dans une proposition subordonnée, alors le verbe de la proposition principale est à l'imparfait de l'indicatif.

So, yes, this would be ungrammatical:

Je suis heureuse que tu fusses ici.

Note also, that indeed the subjunctive is used with certain types of verbs as you mention:

Le subjonctif est un mode utilisé pour exprimer un doute, un fait souhaité, une action incertaine qui n'a donc pas été réalisée au moment où nous nous exprimons. Le subjonctif s'emploie avec des verbes exprimant l'envie, le souhait, le désir, l'émotion, l'obligation, le doute ou l'incertitude.

(same source)

  • Was there no direct statement on what the main verb ought to be when the que-clause is in the subjonctif imparfait (as opposed to subjonctif plus-que-parfait, as in your quote)? I do see that the principle would be the same. – Catomic Jan 26 '17 at 5:54
  • This? Quand on emploie le subjonctif imparfait dans une proposition subordonnée, alors le verbe de la proposition principale est à l'imparfait de l'indicatif. – Frank Jan 26 '17 at 6:08
  • Yes; and if you tell me so I am ready to believe. But since you've taken the trouble to cite a source, I was wondering whether you have not run into a source more directly on point. – Catomic Jan 26 '17 at 8:30
  • The source is the same as in my answer :-) – Frank Jan 26 '17 at 15:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.