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The phrase "Ce n'est pas clair que ...", which demonstrates doubt, requires the subjunctive.

Ce n'est pas clair que la fête ce soir ait lieu chez Pierre.

What about "Ce n'est pas clair si ..." if there are two (or more) options? Is this idiomatic in French? If so, does it require the subjunctive or the indicative?

Ce n'est pas clair si la fête (ait / va avoir) lieu chez Pierre ou chez Marie.

What if there is only one option?

Ce n'est pas clair si la fête (ait / va avoir) lieu chez Pierre.

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First, pas clair que is present in CNRTL, but not pas clair si (as far as I can tell - please correct me if I missed it). In terms of frequency of use in writing, it looks like pas clair si is becoming more and more common. Interestingly, pas clair que was overwhelmingly dominant in the 19th century, but pas clair si is becoming more and more used in the second half of the 20th century. Overall pas clair que is still about twice as frequent as pas clair si today. But still not mentioned in CNRTL as far as I could tell (?)

Back to your sentences, the following sounds ok to me:

Il/Ce n'est pas clair si la fête va avoir lieu chez Pierre ou chez Marie.

and

Il/Ce n'est pas clair si la fête va avoir lieu chez Pierre (ou non).

I don't think the number of options plays any role here, but ait IMHO doesn't work at all. In the second example I put (ou non) in parentheses to indicate that it is optional.

Maybe the following would be even more natural, although not strictly equivalent (this il n'est pas clair is a bit awkward):

Je ne sais pas si la fête va avoir lieu chez Pierre (ou non).

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  • I don't think it's relevant to compare things that don't have the same place in a sentence. For example, you can say "c'est clair que ..." (but clair si make sense only with "c'est pas clair si c'est A ou B". "Clair que" also appears in "A est plus clair que B", or "C'est plus clair que ...*", two situations where you can't use "clair si". It's used in a very specific situation, it's not fair to compare it to "clair que". – Teleporting Goat Jan 27 '17 at 9:36
  • Just look at this ngram and tell me yours isn't biased. Oh and "Je ne sais pas si..." and "C'est pas clair si..." are not equivalent. – Teleporting Goat Jan 27 '17 at 9:36
  • @TeleportingGoat - I am not going to tell you mine isn't biased. I am going to tell you that you are right, that you make a good point, and that I am updating my answer - the new graph shows that pas clair si is becoming more common. :-) – Frank Jan 27 '17 at 15:17
  • @TeleportingGoat - Also, I know that "c'est pas clair si" and "je ne sais pas si" are not strictly equivalent, but "je ne sais pas si" sounds better and quite probable in spoken language to me. Actually, in spoken language we might say something like: c'est pas si clair si c'est chez Pierre ou pas. – Frank Jan 27 '17 at 15:26

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