2

"I understood nothing that was said during the meeting."

Would the translation be the following?

Je n'ai rien compris de ce qui a été dit pendant la réunion.

Two specific questions:

(1) Should rien be placed in front or after the verb compris? If the sentence were just "Je n'ai rien compris", it would be placed in front. But here I'm not sure whether it needs to be placed next to "ce qui ..."

(2) Is the use of the preposition de correct?

4

Yes, your translation is correct.

"rien" is after "comprendre" only in tenses that aren't composed (ex: "Je comprends rien").

à can also be used for "comprendre", but with "ce que" or "ce qui", de seems correct to me.

  • What do you mean by "à can also be used for "comprendre""? Is it correct to say "comprendre à quelque chose"? – user11550 Jan 29 '17 at 23:32
  • @user11550 No, you have to use "rien" or "pas tout" or things like that (like for de). i.e. "J'ai rien compris à ton histoire". It's hard to find sources, but I'd say it's more colloquial. (All I found was this). I'm starting to think "de" is only good with "de ce que". – Teleporting Goat Jan 29 '17 at 23:41
  • @user11550 - Teleporting Goat's "Je comprends rien" is familiar spoken language only. The correct form is "Je ne comprends rien". – Frank Jan 30 '17 at 1:59
  • I concur with Teleporting Goat about the correctness of the OP's sentence. "Rien" is in the right position (and there is no other option), and "de" is the preposition to use here too. – Frank Jan 30 '17 at 2:05
  • I don't see that this answers the question about A versus de ce que/de ce qui. One is for nouns, the other is used to introduce relative clauses. – Lambie Jan 30 '17 at 17:48
-2

The de is right when followed by a clause, for example. The main point of this answer is to show that A or DE, usually depends on a NOUN following ne comprendre rien à (or aux, of course) versus ne compendre rien de ce qui or ce que which introduces a RELATIVE CLAUSE.**

This answer is not about the various ways to say to express which noun comes after the A, as in "ne comprendre rien aux histoires de ma tante"; ne rien comprendre à l'histoire d'Espagne.

I understood nothing about what was said at the meeting or that was said at the meeting.

1) Je n'ai rien compris de ce qui s'est dit pendant la réunion. [Often, a reflexive verb would be used here.]

2) Je n'ai rien compris de ce qui a été dit pendant la réunion. [OK] This is: nothing that was said at the meeting. Please note: that was said and what was said come out the same in French.

3) Je n'ai rien compris de ce qu'ils ont dit. [Versus: à leurs discours ou mots]

Comparison: /Je ne comprends rien à la mathématique/ [a noun] versus /Je ne comprends rien de ce qui [introduces a relative clause] a été dit lors de la réunion/ or /Je ne comprends rien de ce que vous dites/

.

  • 3
    "Je n'ai rien compris à ses mots" is correct and possible, but maybe not very probable. Maybe "Je n'ai rien compris de ses mots", or: "Je n'ai compris aucun de ses mots" would sound more natural. – Frank Jan 30 '17 at 2:04
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    Je n'ai fait que souligner qu'on dit couramment "ne rien comprendre aux mathématiques" et pas "ne rien comprendre à la mathématique", ainsi que d'autres expressions qui ne sont à mon avis pas courantes. Vous devriez écouter et apprendre. Prière de corriger vos "fautes de frappe" aussi, c'est important sur ce site. – Frank Jan 30 '17 at 17:29
  • I said: /This answer is not about the various ways to say to express which noun comes after the A, as in "ne comprendre rien aux histoires de ma tante"; ne rien comprendre à l'histoire d'Espagne./ Whereas YOUR comment is about that. So, please, give me a break. Donc, au fond, vous cherchez à détruire une réponse. Comme toujours, d'ailleurs. – Lambie Feb 21 '17 at 18:16

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