4

Although still very young, he is already a very good lawyer.

How can we translate this sentence?

Même si encore très jeune, il est déjà un très bon avocat.

I'm not sure if "il est déjà un très bon avocat" is correct, because normally we would have to use "c'est un très bon avocat". But saying

Même si encore très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

doesn't seem correct either.

  • 2
    The Académie Française doesn't like "il est un": academie-francaise.fr/il-est-cest-un-0 – Destal Feb 2 '17 at 8:55
  • @SimonDéchamps - I am not sure this applies here. There are other words between "un" and "avocat". I have found multiple instances of "il est un très <adjective> <noun>", including in authors such as Voltaire. For example: "car on me dit qu'outre ses talens, il est un très honnête homme.", "car il est un très-bon homme de main", "... iui a restitué les justices de Saint-Pierre, et qu'il est un très-excellent prince..." ... – Frank Feb 3 '17 at 2:22
  • I believe the context is important, and the example from the Académie Française is not quite the same as what is written here, IMHO. – Frank Feb 3 '17 at 2:24
5

Although still very young, he is already a very good lawyer.

might be translated by:

Bien qu'il soit encore très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

or

Malgré son (très) jeune âge, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

En dépit de son (très) jeune âge, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

Même s'il est encore très jeune, c'est déjà un bon avocat.

or even the more than dubious

*Malgré qu'il est très jeune, c'est déjà un bon avocat.

I personally prefer the slightly more formal bien que than même si here, although both are correct.

The reason is bien que is always introducing a known fact in an opposition (like "although"), while même si (= even if) is normally introducing a hypothetical or irreal fact (reference and here too). However, in our case the hypothesis is realized.

Here is a case of même si used to introduce a realized hypothesis, from the TLFi si entry, I: D: 2. A)

Et même si ce n'étaient là que des rêves, il ne faut pas jouer avec les rêves des hommes (Mauriac,Bâillon dén., 1945, p. 489).

In any case même si encore très jeune is not idiomatic, that should be même s'il est encore très jeune.

Unless used in a formal or literary context where the expression is sporadically found, il est déjà un très bon avocat has all other characteristics of an anglicism, so I would advise to avoid it.

It would certainly be understood but is not what most native speakers would say. The closest idiomatic form would be il est déjà très bon avocat but this form is both rare and formal. C'est déjà un très bon avocat is much more common and can be used in both formal and informal writings and conversations. See also this question.

2

Même si encore très jeune, il est déjà un très bon avocat.

and

Même si encore très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

are grammatically correct, but the following IMHO sound more natural:

Même s'il est encore très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

Bien qu'il soit encore très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

Bien que très jeune, c'est déjà un très bon avocat.

And maybe:

Bien que très jeune, il est déjà bon avocat.

I would probably prefer "il est" rather than "c'est", because I would tend to use "c'est" for inanimate objects rather than people, but I think that both are completely acceptable in this case. I can't really tell whether one is in a better language register than the other, or whether one should be used only when speaking. I think they are really equivalent here. My only comment would be that "Même si encore très jeune" doesn't flow as well as "Même s'il est encore très jeune", in my opinion.

  • 1
    Isn't "il est un bon avocat" incorrect? I've read somewhere that we have to use "c'est un bon avocat". (For example, here.) – user11550 Feb 2 '17 at 2:32
  • In this case, it looks ok to me. In some of the examples at our linked page, it wouldn't work: "c'est mon mari" cannot be replaced by "il est mon mari", indeed. – Frank Feb 2 '17 at 2:40
  • I couldn't tell in this case that one is definitely wrong. Maybe other native speakers will chime in with different opinions. – Frank Feb 2 '17 at 2:42
  • 1
    Il est déjà un très bon avocat is an anglicism, Il est déjà [très] bon avocat is rare, but fine. – jlliagre Feb 3 '17 at 0:56
  • 1
    "Il est un policier." se reconnaît facilement, mais c'est moins tranché pour "il est un très bon ...", à mon avis. De toute façon, "c'est" est plus heureux que "il est". Mais je ne rejetterais pas complètement "il est". – Frank Feb 3 '17 at 1:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.