7

{I said}: Je serai de retour quand j’aurai regardé tout ce qu'il faut regarder dans cette ville !

I wonder if this is the French equivalent of the following English construction.

I'll be back once I see everything there is to see in this city!

There is a nearly identical expression in German, with the „zu“ having the same function as the "to".

Du siehst mich wieder, wenn ich in dieser Stadt alles gesehen habe, was es zu sehen gibt!

But I don't suppose it sounds idiomatic to do the same with French and apply « à », as in « il est à noter que ... », to this particular sentence, does it?

Je serai de retour quand j’aurai regardé tout ce qui est à regarder dans cette ville !

  • Tu peux aussi dire "quand j'aurais écumé cette ville" – MopMop Jun 13 '17 at 10:43
  • 1
    Note that « regarder » means “to look at”. The closest equivalent of “to see” is « voir ». – Grimy Jun 13 '17 at 13:56
26

The most natural way of saying it would be:

... quand j'aurai vu tout ce qu'il y a à voir...

With:

  • voir over regarder
  • tout ce qu'il y a à + verb
  • Ja, it does flow well! ;) But how about when a phrasal verb is several words long: « ... quand j’aurai mis la main sur tout ce qu'il y a à mettre la main ... »? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jun 12 '17 at 11:18
  • vielleich Tout ce qu'il y a sur quoi mettre la main ? – Luke Sawczak Jun 12 '17 at 11:46
  • 3
    @Alone-zee "... quand j'aurai mis la main sur tout ce sur quoi mettre la main ...". I think "il y a" is not the best phrasing to use in this context. – Pierre C. Jun 12 '17 at 12:05
  • I'd go with quand j'aurai mis la main sur tout ce sur quoi il y a à mettre la main. – YSC Jun 12 '17 at 15:22
  • 1
    @Alone-zee I'd probably say “...quand j'aurai mis la main sur tout ce qu'il y a à ramasser...”, simpler than mentioning the whole phrase again, and just as efficient in transmitting the information. – ﺪﺪﺪ Jun 12 '17 at 18:18
9

This is another very natural way to say that, despite it being more informal :

Je serai de retour quand j’en aurai fait le tour

0

I guess a more idiomatic way to say it would be :

... quand j'aurai tout vu de cette ville.

Without the repetition, you imply that you mean "everything possible" within this context (i.e. everything you would be able to see).

I join @AlexisLeGal on his answer. The expression "faire le tour de" is often used in various context and means that you have (or need to) covert the subject.

Il est nécessaire de faire le tour de la question.

Could be translated by

It is necessary to deal with every possibility.

But it's a very "context-wise" expression.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.