1

Je reviens de la boulangerie sur Main Street.

{vs}: Je viens de revenir de la boulangerie sur Main Street.

In order to express the idea of « je viens tout juste de revenir », the speaker said « je reviens ». I wonder if the speaker tried to avoid the duality of « venir » and « revenir »?

2

Je viens de revenir is acceptable but looks like a repetition. Je reviens is indeed better. If you want to insist about the fact it just happened, you can use:

Je reviens juste de la boulangerie sur Main Street.

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  • Hi. I take it, then, that « venir » and « revenir » are rare instances where the present tense can refer to an immediate past. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Jul 13 '17 at 5:41
1

In Je viens de revenir de la boulangerie sur Main Street, there is a repetition of venir which is not very elegant. So I would prefer to use Je reviens de la boulangerie sur Main Street.

If you don't want to use présent de l'indicatif, you may use passé composé:

Je suis revenu de la boulangerie (à l'instant)

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