2

On a assisté à la parade, ma nièce et moi, il y a cinq ans, mais elle était trop jeune pour s’en souvenir.

What I want to say here is:

On a assisté à la parade, ma nièce et moi, il y a cinq ans, mais elle était trop jeune (à l’époque) pour s’en souvenir (aujourd’hui).

But considering that this clause starts with the Imparfait « était », I wonder if the part after « pour » must also refer to something that happened back then, at the same time as the Imparfait « était »:

On a assisté à la parade, ma nièce et moi, il y a cinq ans, mais elle était trop jeune (à l’époque) pour s’en souvenir (à l’époque).

This does not make sense, of course...

  • Elle était trop jeune pour comprendre ? Mais aujourd'hui, elle comprendrait... ? – jcm69 Jul 23 '17 at 19:00
2

The phrase makes sense. "pour s'en souvenir" is a complément circonstanciel de conséquence i.e it expresses the consequences of "elle était trop jeune". There are nothing requiring the consequences to be at the same moment.

Also the phrase is not ambiguous:

  • "elle était trop jeune" can only mean "elle était trop jeune il y a 5 ans", this is by the construction of the phrase.
  • and "pour s'en souvenir" cannot be "il y a 5 ans" as it would not make any sense (that would mean she was remembering what she was living at the same time). Without any other time elements, it can only be understood as "pour s'en souvenir aujourd'hui".
| improve this answer | |
  • Indeed; the semantics of these two verbs make the wrong interpretation very hard! I wonder if it would be possible to find a pair where it is a problem, though. – Luke Sawczak Jul 23 '17 at 1:39
1

The expression is sounding right enough to me, but yes the confusion is logically possible. If the context makes it unclear, or if one of the interlocutors is learning french, or anything alike, just go for the long version, saying out loud what you put between parenthesis, it's slightly heavier but correct also and clearer.

On a assisté à la parade, ma nièce et moi, il y a cinq ans, mais elle était trop jeune à l’époque pour s’en souvenir aujourd’hui.

| improve this answer | |
  • One could even spell out exactly what she is or isn't doing at the time in question: « Elle était trop jeune pour en former des souvenirs » ou quelque chose du genre. – Luke Sawczak Jul 23 '17 at 1:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.