1

On avait déjà l’habitude de ne pas trop s’étendre sur son salaire auprès de ses amis. Voilà que dire ce sur quoi on travaille peut être compromettant. Bientôt, on ne dévoilera même plus le nom de son employeur.

I wonder if "auprès de" is used here to qualify "son salaire" and compare their different pay grades? Or for this specific meaning, do you need to phrase it as:

son salaire auprès de celui de ses amis?

In any case, if you have in mind the meaning of "go into detail about his salary around his friends" in the sense of "in close physical proximity with his friends", is it better to move "auprès de" to right after "s’étendre"?

vs: On avait déjà l’habitude de ne pas trop s’étendre auprès de ses amis sur son salaire.

4

Dans les deux cas :

On avait déjà l’habitude de ne pas trop s’étendre sur son salaire auprès de ses amis.

On avait déjà l’habitude de ne pas trop s’étendre auprès de ses amis sur son salaire.

il n'y a pour moi aucune ambiguïté, auprès de est employé pour exprimer la proximité spatiale, et on pourrait le remplacer par devant /en présence de.

Pour exprimer une comparaison dans les salaires je tournerais la phrase tout autrement :

On avait déjà l’habitude de ne pas trop s’étendre sur son salaire comparé à celui de ses amis.

Voici une phrase où auprès de exprime une comparaison : 

Son salaire est élevé auprès de celui de ses amis. (Leurs salaires sont élevés auprès de ceux de ses/leurs amis).

On peut aussi avoir deux substantifs différents :

Ce petit incident n'est rien auprès du grand vide qu'a laissé son départ.

3

No. The meaning does not change depending on its position in the sentence.

Your translation is correct ("around his friends"), as a french synonym of "auprès de" would be "a proximité de".

The position of the group "auprès de ses amis" is variable, and both are perfectly correct and usable. Naturally, I would use the first one ("auprès" at the end).

Placing the group just after "s'étendre" might seem a little old-fashioned.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.