0

Si notre compagnie était reprise par X, elle en supporterait les conséquences !

{vs}: Si notre compagnie devait être reprise par X, elle devrait en supporter les conséquences !

The use of "devoir" serves to indicate that their occurrence is somewhat less probable than what would be the case with the version described without it.

But does it sound idiomatic to use two consecutive "devoir"s like this, both in the subordinate and the main clause? Or should I limit its use to either of the two clauses?

1

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec les autres réponses, parce que je pense que la répétition de "devoir" est ambiguë, et devrait donc être évitée.

Soit vous voulez dire :

Il y a une probabilité que notre entreprise soit reprise, et alors elle en supportera inévitablement les conséquences.

Soit :

Si notre entreprise venait à être reprise, il faudrait (moralement, ou dans notre intérêt) que ce soit elle (et personne d'autre) qui en supporte les conséquences.

Plus simplement, la première phrase se reformulerait :

Si notre entreprise devait être reprise, elle en supporterait les conséquence.

Et la seconde :

Si notre entreprise venait à être reprise, elle devrait en supporter les conséquences.

  • 1
    « Elle » représente une employée ou une personne ayant un lien avec l'entreprise, pas l'entreprise elle-même (voir les commentaires d'Alone-zee après ma réponse). – jlliagre Aug 23 '17 at 15:19
  • Ca ne change pas ma réponse mais je suis d'accord que nous disons la même chose. – Distic Aug 23 '17 at 15:33
  • Hi. Regarding "Si notre entreprise venait à être reprise, elle devrait en supporter les conséquences": Is it impossible to interpret this "devrait" as "elle pourrait / might en supporter les conséquences"? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 23 '17 at 15:39
  • 1
    Ce n'est pas la répétition de devoir qui est ambiguë, uniquement sa deuxième utilisation. – Misery Aug 23 '17 at 15:40
  • @Alone-zee It is possible to interpret it this way indeed. – Misery Aug 23 '17 at 15:42
0

French tend to avoid repeating the same word or verb, unless it is done for stylish effects so I would suggest:

Si notre société1 était reprise par X, elle devrait en supporter les conséquences !

Note that the sentence is ambiguous. It is unclear what elle refers to, the acquiring company, the one being absorbed, or (actually the case) something else.

1Company is better translated by société, entreprise, or just boite in casual speech.

  • Hi. I intended "elle" to mean "she {person}", not the company. How would you paraphrase the sentence, then? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 23 '17 at 14:04
  • Ah, okay. It was impossible to guess without context. If you are talking about that person before, you can keep elle and that would stay clear. Otherwise, replace elle by that person's first or last name (e.g. Marie, or Mme Martin), or her title/function (e.g. la commerciale). – jlliagre Aug 23 '17 at 14:10
0

As @jlliagre said, French tend to avoid repeating the same word or verb but in that case, I believe that it depends on what exactly you want to say.

Si notre société (était/devait être) reprise par X, elle devrait en supporter les conséquences !

This sentence has two meanings to me, the important part being the second devoir :

  1. The company1 should and will take consequences
  2. The company1 is probably prepared to take consequences (and probably isn't)

For the first devoir in the sentence, it only depends on how much you want to express the possibility for this case to happen. If you believe you should use it, then use it.

For the second devoir, I believe it is ambiguous because of the tense you use. It's more common to use future tense if what you are saying is that the company will take consequences.

Si notre société devait être reprise par X, elle devra en supporter les conséquences !

Si notre société devait être reprise par X, elle en supportera les conséquences !

If it's not what you were trying to say, then keep using conditionnel tense and for the repeating of the verb devoir, if I had to remove one, it will be the first occurence, but it's not an obligation.

1or to whatever refers elle in your sentence

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.