3

I understand this is a pretty broad issue for a single question, but I can't even ask in meta if that's okay. Since it has been an unresolved issue for me for quite some time, and it would be usuful for others to have this summed up somewhere, I decided to roll the dice on this one.

I've been compiling sources to establish when to use tant / autant / tellement / si / aussi. Some of the sources – including this forum – seemed to be mutually exclusive and/or addressing the issue only partially, especially that there is a multi-level overlap between those terms. Would you agree with the compilation below?

=========================

1. EXCLAMATION DÉMONSTRATIVE

1.1. Exclamation démonstrative : Adverbes de degré + VERBE

EN: so much
tant, tellement 
• Je t'aime ~ !
• Cette femme ~ aimée.*

1.2. Exclamation démonstrative : Adverbes de degré + ADVERBE

EN: so
si, tellement
• Elle chante ~ bien !

1.3. Exclamation démonstrative : Adverbe de quantité + VERBE

EN: so much
tant, tellement
• Elle parle ~ !
• Il travaille ~ !
• Le jour où il a tant plu. (= tellement ?)

1.4. Exclamation démonstrative : Adverbe de quantité + NOM

EN: so much/so many
tant de, tellement de
• Vous avez ~ d'amis !
• Il parle ~ de toi !
• Il a ~ de chance !
• Je lui ai dit qu'il me devait tant d’argent. (= as much money)
• Je lui ai dit qu'il me devait tellement d’argent. (= so much money)

1.5. Exclamation démonstrative : Adverbe de degré + ADJECTIF

EN: so
si, tellement
• Nous sommes ~ forts !

2. COMPARAISON SIMPLE

2.1. Comparaison simple : Adverbe de degré + ADJECTIF

EN: as, as much as
si*, aussi
• Il est ~ fort que moi.
• Est-elle toujours ~ belle ?
• L'air ici n'est pas ~ pur qu'à la campagne.
* utilisé de moins en moins.

2.2. Comparaison simple : Adverbe de degré + ADVERBE

EN: as
aussi
• Elle chante AUSSI bien que moi.

2.3. Comparaison simple : Adverbe de quantité + VERBE

EN: as many/as much
autant
• Il pleut AUTANT qu’hier.

2.4. Comparaison simple : Adverbe de quantité + NOM

EN: as many/as mucha
autant
• Il a AUTANT de problèmes qu’avant.

3. INTENSITÉ AVEC CONSÉQUENCE

3.1. Intensité avec conséquence : Adverbe de degré + ADJECTIF

EN: so
si, tellement
• Il est ~ fort qu’il a battu tout le monde

3.2. Intensité avec conséquence : Adverbe de degré + ADVERBE

EN: so
si, tellement
• Elle chante ~ bien qu’il a séduit le public.

3.3. Intensité avec conséquence : Adverbe de degré + VERBE

EN: so much
tant, tellement
• Il pleut ~ qu’il y a eu des inondations.

3.4. Intensité avec conséquence : Adverbe de quantité + NOM

EN: so much/so many
tant, tellement
•  Il a eu ~ de problèmes qu’il a dû abandonner.

4. COMPARAISON AVEC CONSÉQUENCE

4.1. Comparaison modale : Intensité + INF

EN: just as well
autant, autant vaut
• Autant nous résigner. *We can just as well quit.*

5. EXPRESSIONS IDIOMATIQUES

5.1. Tant bien que mal

= avec des difficultés
EN: as best as one can
• Malgré sa concentration, il y est parvenu tant bien que mal.

5.2. Tant et si bien (que)

= beaucoup, avec conséquence
EN: so much (that), to such an extent (that)
• Il s'est concentré tant et si bien qu'il y est parvenu.

5.3. Tant et tant

= beaucoup
EN: so much, a lot and a bit more
• Après tant et tant d'efforts, il y est parvenu.

5.4. Autant en emporte le vent

= promesses non-exécutées
EN: gone with the wind

COMMENTAIRES/REMARQUES :

*Tant* est plus formel que *tellement*.

=========================

Apart from StackExchange, I made use of wordreference.com and those two: http://french.about.com/library/weekly/bl-tantvsautant.htm http://66.46.185.79/bdl/gabarit_bdl.asp?id=2019

  • 1
    Je pense qu'on peut dire "Nous sommes tellement forts !" aussi bien que "Nous sommes si forts !". Et il y a une erreur à "Es-elle toujours belle ?" pour "Est-elle toujours belle ?" – Distic Sep 26 '17 at 8:47
  • Tu as raison, la seconde, c'était une faute de frappe dans – quand même, les deux sont momentanément mises à jour, merci :) – MrVocabulary Sep 26 '17 at 17:44
3

Une petite contribution:

  • Proposition pour une nouvelle catégorie:

    1. Expressions idiomatiques

"Tant bien que mal": avec des difficultés.

Exemple : "Malgré sa concentration, il y est parvenu tant bien que mal.".

"Tant et si bien": beaucoup, avec conséquence

Exemple: "Il s'est concentré tant et si bien qu'il y est parvenu"

"Tant et tant": beaucoup

Exemple: "Après tant et tant d'efforts, il y est parvenu"

  • Egalement, "autant en emporte le vent" pourrait avoir sa place quelque part dans la classification. Probablement au chapitre 2. Je ne pense pas que la phrase soit idiomatique... mais il y a l'influence de la traduction du titre "gone with the wind".

  • "Autant" (chapitre 2 ?): "C'est trop compliqué. Autant ne rien faire".

  • 1
    That was a nice idea to expand the subject. – SteffX Sep 23 '17 at 18:12
  • Thanks for the contribution, I included you comments, but ended up adding a new section for "autant (vaut)" after reading a definition @ Larousse: larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/autant/6551/… it doesn't seem to firmly fit to any other category to me. – MrVocabulary Sep 26 '17 at 8:05
1

1.2 : You could add "elle chante TELLEMENT bien"

1.3 : "Le jour qu'il a tant plu" is incorrect and could be either:

• "le jour QUI LUI A TANT/tellement PLU" ("the day which pleased him so much")

• "le jour OÙ il a tant plu" ("the day where it rained so much")*

1.4 "Je lui ai dit qu'il me devait tant (d’argent)." - "Tant" and "tellement" are notequivalent in this case. In such a case, "tant" means "as much as" (followed by a quantity) whereas "tellement" means "so much"

3.2 : You could add "si" or "tellement"

Overall, I agree with your compilation.

(*) Editing according to comments

  • Thanks for the tips! I actually started questioning if "Il parle ~ de toi !" belongs to quantity, as it's more "parler de" than "tant/tellement de"… – MrVocabulary Sep 19 '17 at 19:08
  • 1
    I'd rather understand le jour qu'il a tant plu to be a relaxed/regional form of le jour où il a tant plu (the day it rained so much). – jlliagre Sep 20 '17 at 7:26
  • @jlliagr that was my initial understanding, too, but then I thought I messed something up… Sounds weird either way… – MrVocabulary Sep 20 '17 at 21:07
  • 1
    All the occurrences of le jour qu'il a tant plu google finds, including the 8th edition of the Dictionnaire de l'Académie française (1935) definitely match le jour il a tant plu. – jlliagre Sep 20 '17 at 21:25
  • 2
    @jiliagre Yes it seems obvious now. I do not know why I focused on another interpretation. Thanks for your contribution. – SteffX Sep 23 '17 at 18:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.