3

This question comes from this one and the comments below the answer.

The sentence is the following:

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pourrais acheter que des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom...qu'achèterais-tu ?

But I think it should be:

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pouvais acheter que des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom...qu'achèterais-tu ?

because "que" is used here as a conjunction and not a pronoun, so that "que" is at the same level as "si".

If it was used as a pronoun, we can have:

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pourrais utiliser que pour des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom...qu'achèterais-tu ?

Am I right? What are the rules in this situation?

3

Indeed, here the conjunction que is used in place of si, so the same grammatical rules apply regarding tense and mood. Si, and que when it stands for si, cannot be followed by a conditional verb. (This rule is not systematically followed in colloquial speech, but it's still a rule — people who break it are generally aware that they're transgressing.) The correct and idiomatic sentence is

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pouvais acheter que des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom... qu'achèterais-tu ?

A relative clause takes the same tense and mood as its parent clause, barring other factors. So:

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pouvais utiliser que pour des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom... qu'achèterais-tu ?

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais qui ne pouvaient être utilisés que pour des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom... qu'achèterais-tu ?

Si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un qui en était capable, ce serait fait.

One other factor is if the relative clause itself is conditional relative to its parent clause. Contrast:

Si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un qui avait une voiture, je lui aurais demandé de me raccompagner.   (Assuming somebody is found, “avoir une voiture” is an immediate quality, so the relative clause is in the same tense.)
Si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un qui aurait pu me raccompagner, je lui aurais demandé de le faire.   (Assuming somebody is found, the relative clause is a hypothetical capability, so the relative clause is in the conditional mood.)

This level of nesting is uncommon in ordinary speech. Rather than use a relative clause, it feels more natural to say either the original sentence or

Si tu pouvais avoir un million de dollars américains, mais que tu ne pouvais les utiliser que pour des choses commençant par la première lettre de ton prénom... qu'achèterais-tu ?

  • Very good answer but you can not say si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un qui aurait pu me ramener. Even for a hypothetical relative you have to say si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un qui avait pu me ramener. Or to insist on the nested condition, use a comma or a conjonction : si j'avais trouvé quelqu'un, qu'il avait pu me ramener... – Emmanuel BRUNO Oct 21 '17 at 7:24
0

Using conditional instead of imperfect in a clause headed by si is an exceedingly common error of informal/oral French, and that's quite simply what you've got going here (The mnemonic you often hear in quebec goes "Les scies (si) mangent les raies"). It's entirely possible (even probable, as much as I dislike it) that eventually this will be considered the correct usage.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.