1

Tes compétences dépassent de loin tout ce que je ne pourrais jamais espérer accomplir.

vs: Tes compétences dépassent de loin tout ce que je pourrais jamais espérer accomplir.

In expressing this idea, I'm wavering between the two. My gut tells me to go for the first, but...

If they are both acceptable, I wonder if the negated version serves to further emphasise her infinite capabilities that could even go beyond my realm of impossibility.


The way I see it, the rational for using "ne ... jamais" is:

Devenir président français, c'est ce que je ne pourrais jamais espérer accomplir.

This is considered to be an already impossibly lofty achievement for me. However:

Tes compétences te permettent d'aller bien au-delà de tout ça {= tout ce que je ne pourrais jamais espérer accomplir}.

She could achieve things that I couldn't even hope to achieve.

Which essentially leads to the first construction.

2

The basic sentence would be:

Tes compétences dépassent de loin tout ce que je pourrais espérer accomplir.

It is slightly odd as competences are not something that can be accomplies. You might rephrase it that way:

Tes compétences te permettent d'aller bien au-delà de tout ce que je pourrais espérer accomplir.

Anyway, the core sentence can be strengthened by adding jamais (meaning at any time, not never here).

Tes compétences dépassent de loin tout ce que je pourrais jamais espérer accomplir.

"Your skills exceed by far anything I can ever hope to achieve"

Negating the last part creates a weird sentence, "better than nothing instead of better than anything", and I would recommend avoiding it:

Tes compétences dépassent de loin tout ce que je ne pourrais jamais espérer accomplir.

"Your skills exceed by far anything I can never hope to achieve"

A few notes about jamais:

This word comes from the latin iam and magis (more) which gave jam and mais in old French. It is also found in the word déjà (already). Like the Latin iam, jamais has more than one understanding and might mean, "at any time, ever", mostly in the positive sentences (si jamais je réussis: if I ever succeed), or "at no time, never" when used alone or in a negative sentence (Il ne reviendra jamais: he will never come back).

  • Hi. What's your take on the edited part? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 18 '18 at 9:17
  • I wouldn't use jamais when translating your sentence: "She could achieve things that I couldn't even hope to achieve" : elle pouvait faire des choses que je ne pouvais même pas imaginer réussir. With jamais, that might be, elle pouvait faire des choses que je n'aurais jamais réussi, même en rêve... – jlliagre Aug 18 '18 at 15:11
0
  • jamais = never
  • ne + jamais = never ever

On part de l'origine latine unquam (un jour, en un temps quelconque) auquel l'adverbe ne va donner le sens négatif ne unquam contracté nunquam.

Jamais est issu de ce nunquam latin qui, comme on le voit comporte déjà la négation ne. => Nul besoin de la rajouter en français.

"mes cèdres tenant jamais ce qu'ils promettent." (Chateaubriand)

Le ne français est une négation dite affaiblie. Cette négation a besoin d'être confirmée par la suite en usant d'un terme portant lui aussi un sens négatif. D'où la construction Ne... pas, Ne... jamais... qui est donc parfaitement correcte.

En conclusion... jamais n'a pas besoin d'un ne supplémentaire mais ne, lui, a besoin de jamais. (ou d'un autre terme négatif)

  • Tu confonds ne ... oncques et jam ... mais (cf. esp. nunca et jamás), peut-être par ce que oncques et jam ont tous deux un côté « éniantosémique »... ;-) – jlliagre Aug 18 '18 at 15:01
  • Si tu lis l'espagnol: spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/11949/… – jlliagre Aug 18 '18 at 15:16
  • @jlliagre you speak Spanish, as well ? – temporary_user_name Aug 18 '18 at 18:22
  • 1
    @Aerovistae Cada vez que tengo la oportunidad :-) – jlliagre Aug 18 '18 at 18:38

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.