3

The vocabulary needed seems simple enough but I'm struggling with composing a whole sentence. Is there a natural French phrase to say this kind of things half jestingly?


(You wave at total strangers just to see how they would react?)

  • You got a strange idea for fun!
  • 1
    Hmm, I say "a strange idea of fun"! You really say "for"? – Luke Sawczak Sep 18 '18 at 17:01
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Aside from the already mentioned "Tu as de drôles de façons de t'amuser !", if you're going for something sarcastic:

Ah bon... C'est original, comme façon de s'amuser.

1

If I understand correctly1 what the English sentence means, that might be:

Tu [en] as de drôles de façons de t'amuser !

Or the colloquial:

T'es un peu chelou, toi !

1I guess I did, Flying_whale had the very same sentence in mind too...

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    You posted the exact same answer like 15 seconds before me :p, the meaning is a bit different, but another way could be Un rien ne t'amuse . To enphasis on the fact that the personne get fun easily – Flying_whale Sep 18 '18 at 12:09
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    @Flying_whale That should rather be Un rien t'amuse then. – jlliagre Sep 18 '18 at 12:14
  • @Flying_whale 16 seconds precisely ... Les grands esprits se rencontrent ;-) – jlliagre Sep 18 '18 at 12:18
  • The plural "de drôles de façons" sprang to mind first, but now that I think about it, I can't put my finger on how the singular version compares: "Tu as un drôle de façon de t'amuser." – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Sep 18 '18 at 12:33
  • @Con-gras-tue-les-chiens I'd rather suggest: Tu en as une drôle de façon de t'amuser ! – jlliagre Sep 18 '18 at 12:35
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Good answers already :

  • This one, lightly facetious
    Tu [en] as de drôles de façons de t’amuser !
  • ...and that one, a little more sarcastic
    Ah bon... C'est original, comme façon de s'amuser.

To add more examples on the sarcastic side, I suggest :

  • Ça amuse les enfants ! → common in the area of Quebec where I grew up, back in the nineties. It has remained to this day, but it’s somewhat less used now.
  • On s’amuse comme on peut... → implies to a certain point that the silliness of the game is a consequence of a poor imagination.
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The following suggestion is slightly off for it doesn’t directly call into question the level of strangeness of someone’s idea of fun, but rather how low they’ve set their “fun-bar” (i.e., how little it takes to amuse them), but it can, at least, be used to poke some good-natured fun at the activity and those who consider it to be fun:

Ça t’amuse vraiment ? Hé bien/Alors, il t'en faut {vraiment} peu {pour t’amuser/pour être heureux/euse} !

(follow the above link to a WordRefernce.com thread discussing "il t'en faut peu")

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