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I’m just wondering if these are acceptable or not. In English, these two are distinguished.

I peeled an apple, but it isn’t completely peeled.

I was peeling an apple, but it isn’t completely peeled.

In French, are the following acceptable or not? Do these sentences sound weird, a little weird or acceptable?

J’ai épluché une orange, mais elle n’est pas complètement épluchée.

J'épluchais une orange, mais elle n’est pas complètement épluchée.

J’ai pelé une orange, mais elle n’est pas complètement pelée.

Je pelais une orange, mais elle n’est pas complètement pelée.

If these are acceptable, could I remove the word “complètement”? and would these still be acceptable? I am not a native French speaker, so I don't have an intuition for judging acceptability.

This is concerning telic verbs. These examples are weird, I know.

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    I did my best to turn this into something that can be understood. I hope it matches what you were asking about. – Stéphane Gimenez Dec 17 '18 at 23:40
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Your propositions are all weird but not for the same reasons. First of all, we (French) would rather say something like "I peeled an apple, but not completely/entirely" (we do not like to reuse the same verb/adjective in a sentence).

Second, the tenses mean different things: if you say "J'ai épluché/pelé...", it means that you were peeling that damn fruit but, somehow, it ended up not completely peeled. However, if you use "J'épluchais/pelais..." then it suggests that you had planned not to peel it completely and it sort of contradicts the use of "mais", because there should be no opposition between the 2 parts of the sentence. So those sentences feel weirder.

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