1

When reading LeMonde I stumbled upon this sentence "le préfet de Haute-Loire ne souhaite plus communiquer sur la sécurité routière, fût-ce pour donner des chiffres."

I found that ne fût-ce que means only if but I don't understand why the 'ne' is omitted in this case and how (and whether) it changes meaning.

My attempt at a translation: the Haute-Loire prefect doesn't wish to communicate about the matter of road security (apart from giving some figures?)

0

You're wrong on the meaning of fût-ce: it means even if, not only if. It can be replaced by serait-ce, used really more often, and simpler to use. The actual translation is:

The Haute-Loire prefect doesn't wish to communicate about the matter of road security anymore, even if that means only giving some numbers

Also, the following two means the same thing, that's where the absence of ne arises:

  • ..., ne fût-ce que pour...
  • ..., fût-ce pour...

You might also check this explanation of fût-ce by the Voltaire Project.

1

Fût-ce and ne fût-ce que are mostly synonymous. They are the literary equivalent of serait-ce and ne serait-ce que.

C'est pour donner des chiffres
Ce serait pour donner des chiffres
Ce fût pour donner des chiffres (subjunctive imperfect) : Fût-ce pour donner des chiffres.

Ce n'est que pour donner des chiffres.
Ce ne serait que pour donner des chiffres.
Ce ne fût que pour donner des chiffres : Ne fût-ce que pour donner des chiffres.

1

À partir d'un ngram on voit que les deux formes sont utilisées et la forme courte est plus courante; on trouve dans le TLFi qu'elles ont le même sens (ne serait-ce que, même si ce n'était que).

Your translation should be something suh as "even if for not more than giving some figures".

0

Your translation is quite good.

Here fût-ce could also be translated as

Ne serait-ce que (pour donner des chiffres).

A part (pour donner des chiffres).

Also, there's no ne in the sentence, probably to avoid the repetition with

Le préfet de Haute-Loire ne souhaite plus

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.