3

Can you please tell me the difference between the use of:

  • que
  • où que

in a relative sentence ? I can't find any logic in it. And I haven't also found any site or book talking about it.

Here is a couple of sentences I found (I can provide more context if needed):

C'est dans ce décor qu'un jeune fait sa toilette devant le rétroviseur d'une voiture.
On m'a dit que c'était ici que dormaient les migrants.
Il s'est amené tout droit là où qu'on déjeunait.
Il a dit: Où qu'ils ont foutu le camp ?
Il a le dos travers là il a reçu un coup de pied de cheval.

2

First, où que is nonstandard French. It's a grammatical mistake that some natives make, and I don't think it's common enough to be accepted as informal spoken French. The correct formulation is .

Il s'est amené tout droit là où on déjeunait.   (informal)
Il est venu directement là où nous déjeunions.   (formal)

Il a dit : « Où ils ont foutu le camp ? »  (informal)
Il a dit : « Où est-ce qu'ils ont foutu le camp ? »  (informal; in this sentence “est-ce” may be completely omitted, effectively yielding “où que”)
Il a dit : « Où ont-ils déguerpi ? »  (formal)

In the two sentences you quote with a clause introduced by que, that clause is actually not a complement that indicates a location. The subordinate clause is the complement of a presentative (“c'est … que …”). For example, in the first sentence, « dans ce décor » is the location, and « qu'un jeune fait sa toilette […] » is the action that happens in this location.

In the last sentence, « là où … » is a complement that indicates a location, hence the use of to introduce the subordinate clause.

(This may not be the whole story, but it covers all your examples.)

  • 1
    Note that où que may be correct, but only in the meaning of "wherever". Ex: où que tu ailles, tu trouveras toujours un endroit où passer la nuit. – Greg Mar 7 at 7:59
0
  1. C'est dans ce décor qu'un jeune fait sa toilette devant le rétroviseur d'une voiture.
  2. On m'a dit que c'était ici que dormaient les migrants.
  3. Il s'est amené tout droit là où qu'on déjeunait.
  4. Il a dit: Où qu'ils ont foutu le camp ?
  5. Il a le dos travers là où il a reçu un coup de pied de cheval.

As a beginner, you'd do well to ignore, « 3 », « 4 » and « 5 » ; that's non standard grammar ; you'll learn how to discriminate later.

In the first sentence you are dealing with the subordinating conjunction « que » ; it is difficult to decide whether it's the conjonction or the object relative pronoun ; nevertheless, you should remember that the peoblem is similar in English ;

  • I told him that it is on the next day. (conjonction)
  • The player kicked the ball that had been thrown to him. (relative pronoun)

You have to analyse the sentence in order to determine which is which. As you know that in the first case « que » is not an object, you ask yourself if « que » being an object of the verb makes sense. There is an object already : if you ask "Quest-ce que fait le jeune ?" you see obviously that is "sa toilette", that's the object of the verb ; therefore « que » is not an object and it has to be the conjunction.

I'll leave to you the analysis of the sentence « 2. ». (By the way, « foutre le camp » is a vulgar way to say « partir » ; it 's not standard French.)

The third sentence becomes correct grammatically by removing the intrusive conjunction ; (however, « s'amener » is popular and colloquial, rather vulgar ; normally one says « venir ».)

  • Il s'est amené tout droit là où on déjeunait.

The fourth sentence is analysed similarly as the third.

There is no difficulty in the fith except a faulty adjectival locution ; it's not « travers » but « de travers » ;

  • Il a le dos de travers là où il a reçu un coup de pied de cheval.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.