2

French politician says

C'est de liberté dont notre économie a besoin.

In my textbook I have found this phrase

Tous ceux qui en ont besoin toucheront une bourse.

Why in the second example we use en instead of dont? Merci

3

Réponse principalement en français accompagnée par la traduction des essentiels en anglais entre parenthèses.

Notre économie a besoin de liberté. (rappel : avoir besoin de)

Dont est un pronom relatif qui remplace de + antécédent dans la subordonnée relative. Ici, dont remplace donc de liberté. (It is a relative pronoun which replaces de + antecedent in the relative subordinate.)

C'est de liberté dont notre économie a besoin.

Autre exemple :

J'ai besoin de ces stylos.

Ce sont ces stylos dont j'ai besoin.

Ici, dont remplace de ce stylos.

La construction avec c'est/ce sont comme ci-dessus s'appelle mise en relief, une tournure grammaticale très importante en français. (The framing device c’est . . . qui/que/dont is very frequently used in spoken and written French to highlight a particular element. French Grammar in Context, p. 211.)


Concernant la seconde phrase de la question. (Regarding the second question.)

Tous ceux qui ont besoin d'argent/de support financier/etc. (hypothétiquement) toucheront une bourse.

En est ici un pronom personnel complément qui remplace d'argent/de suppport/etc.. (En is here a personal pronoun complement replacing...)

Tous ceux qui en ont besoin toucheront une bourse.

Pour aller plus loin :

https://www.lingoda.com/en/french/learning-material/cefr/B1.2/les-doubles-pronoms-1/download

https://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2guides/guides/chroniq/index-fra.html?lang=fra&lettr=indx_autr84vWAiHFbX6w&page=9OU4XXgOiRWE.html

http://www.aidenet.eu/grammaire12a.htm

2

When dont has a possessive meaning, it can be translated by whose, of which:

La Ville dont le prince est un enfant

The City Whose Prince is a Child

When it has no possessive meaning, it can be translated by that, whom, which or just skipped in English:

C'est le livre dont je t'ai parlé

It's the book (that) I talk you about.

In the first sentence, there is no possessive meaning:

C'est de liberté dont notre économie a besoin.

It is equivalent to the following sentences:

La liberté, c'est ce dont notre économie a besoin.

La liberté, c'est de cela dont notre économie a besoin.

La liberté, c'est de quoi notre économie a besoin.

They can be translated to:

Liberty, this is what our economy is in need of.

or maybe:

Liberty, this is that our economy is in need of.

Literally :

It is (of) liberty that our economy is in need of.


In the second sentence, en is close to the English "it":

Tous ceux qui en ont besoin toucheront une bourse.

means:

Tous ceux qui ont besoin d'une bourse toucheront une bourse

Literally :

All of those who need it will get a scholarship.

While it and that can sometimes be used interchangeably, en and dont do not span the same range of meanings.

  • 2
    You just can't explain grammar though translation to a language that uses a different grammar. – Stéphane Gimenez Mar 17 at 12:43
  • @StéphaneGimenez Yes, my initial wording was definitely lacking explanations. – jlliagre Mar 17 at 14:13
  • I don't understand your answer, what doesn't fit at all to translate dont here. (that is much closer in almost every case) – Teleporting Goat Mar 18 at 10:36
  • @TeleportingGoat You are right. What was more there to translate ce than dont in my examples. Answer reworked. – jlliagre Mar 18 at 11:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.