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The following sentence appears in a job posting:

C’est toute une décision que de se joindre à une entreprise.

I am confused by this sentence, starting at the "de". It does not match any kind of grammatical sentence construction that I have seen before.

For example, the following sentence would be a construction that I have seen before:

  • "C'est une décision que je veux faire". (This construction is the very first use of "que" that French learners learn.

In fact, I expect some kind of pronoun (such as "je" in the example above) to come right after the "que". To see "que de se joindre" confuses me, and even to see a verb right after ("que se joindre") would confuse me.

Questions:

  1. What does this sentence mean? What is its construction?
  2. Can you give other examples of sentences with "que" followed by "de"?
  3. Are there sentences that exist with "que" followed by a verb?

marked as duplicate by silph, Community Apr 16 at 15:42

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