5

It sometimes happens that something you're wearing on your body, such as a wrist watch, shoes, contact lenses, glasses and so on, feels so comfortable, due to their being lightweight or thin, that you forget wearing them on your wrist, on your feet, in your eyes, over your face. How do you say this in French?

3

Je ne connais pas d'expression particulière pour exprimer cette idée.

Je dirais simplement "vous oubliez que vous portez quelque chose" ou "on oublie que l'on porte quelque chose"

  • Hi. In the case of a watch on your wrist, for instance, I'd say: "Cette montre est tellement légère qu'elle se fait oublier au poignet" or "... qu'elle ne se fait pas ressentir au poignet". I get the feeling, though, that "elle ne se fait pas ressentir au poignet" might sound rather odd, as "se faire ressentir" is usually about a feeling, an atmosphere, or an effect. I'm curious. What's your take on this? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens May 5 at 20:55
  • 1
    @Con-gras-tue-les-chiens. I agree with you. The first two sentences that you propose sound quite good for a watch. I don't like the other. We could say too "on ne la sent pas au poignet" – Damien May 5 at 21:44
  • @Con-gras-tue-les-chiens "Se faire oublier" is not proper for inanimates as it is a verbal expression that connotes behavioural notions. – LPH May 5 at 22:11
  • 4
    @LPH It seems you're not quite familiar with the structure "se faire + infinitive". The phrase "quelque chose (une montre etc.) se fait oublier" is commonly used in French. The phrase "ma voiture se fait réparer" may be one of the clearest and easiest examples where you can learn how "se faire + infinitive" is commonly used with something 'inanimate'. See Damien's comment, too. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens May 5 at 22:33
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Gilles May 6 at 6:20
2

French version of the answer

Il me semble que le français prendra pour référence « penser à quelque chose » alors que l'anglais se base sur « oublier quelque chose », ce qui entraine une négation: « sans penser <==> oublier ». Cela est vrai pour d'autres formes verbales. On dira donc aussi, de façon concise mais, il me semble, pas la plus expressive

  • « Vous portez cela sans y penser. », « Ça se porte sans y penser. », « Ça se porte sans que l'on ait à y penser. ».

Une autre option de même nature avec le verbe « savoir »

  • Ça se porte sans même que vous sachiez que vous l'avez sur vous.
  • vous le portez sans savoir que vous l'avez sur vous.

On pourrait dire cela aussi d'une façon plus détendue, en ajoutant des pourquois et des comments ;

  • C'est si léger et si bien ajusté que l'on ne sait même pas qu'on le porte.

Voici un example où est utilisé un verbe quelque peu plus explicite ;

  • C'est quelque chose que vous portez sans (même) vous rendre compte que vous le portez.

English version

It seem to me that the French will use as a reference "penser à quelque chose" (think about sth) whereas the English is based upon "oublier quelque chose" (to forget sth), which entails a negation: « sans penser <==> oublier ». This is true for other verbal forms. Therefore, we'll say also, in a concise manner, albeit it seems to me, not in the most expressive of ways

  • « Vous portez cela sans y penser. », « Ça se porte sans y penser. », « Ça se porte sans que l'on ait à y penser. ».

Another option along the same line, but with the verb "savoir"

  • Ça se porte sans même que vous sachiez que vous l'avez sur vous.
  • vous le portez sans savoir que vous l'avez sur vous.

That could be said in a more leisurely fashion, that is with a supplement of information as to the hows and whys;

  • C'est si léger et si bien ajusté que l'on ne sait même pas qu'on le porte.

Here is an example in which is used a somewhat more explicit verb;

C'est quelque chose que vous portez sans (même) vous rendre compte que vous le portez.

  • 2
    I appreciate your answer but I'd also appreciate if you could display more restraint when speaking to other members in my questions at least. It looks to me like your statements in comment are due to some misguided sense of competition on your end or due to some kind of frustration in life but I don't like to see a person get worked up over nothing like this. I want to study French in more peace. :( – Merissa May 6 at 7:28
  • @Merissa I'm touched by your concern for your fellow's peace of mind, but I can't let it override the necessity of keeping with the argument, of preserving myself from the ills of all sorts of unfounded allegations concerning me and my answers; I hope you can understand that; do forget the apparent bickering you might witness, as it does not concern you and remember, not all comments made are kept posted, nor are you aware of all those that have been made in circumstances other than those of your question. – LPH May 6 at 11:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.