3

In conversation, I just said:

En arrivant à l'aéroport, on est passés par je ne sais combien de contrôles de sécurité tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres.

While I've personally never heard/seen "aussi" used in this specific construction, I wonder if you can also say:

En arrivant à l'aéroport, on est passés par je ne sais combien de contrôles de sécurité tous aussi rigoureux les uns que les autres.

Leaving aside the difference in meaning between "plus" and "aussi" as a single word, is there no practical difference between the two constructions? Or does the use of "aussi" take away from the hyperbolic nature of the expression?


I mean, in contrast to instances where "peu" is thrown into the mix, in which case the use of "plus" is no longer an option:

... tous aussi peu justifiés les uns que les autres

  • in "tous aussi peu justifiés" the "aussi" is on "peu justifiés"; as you could say "tous aussi justifiés". That said, you could not use plus because "tous plus peu justifiés" would sound strange; you'd say "tous plus injustifié..." – OznOg Jun 30 at 10:42
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For me there is a little (subjective) difference between "plus" and "aussi"

tous aussi rigoureux les uns que les autres

Mean that all checks perfectly follow the same strict protocol.

tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres

Mean that all check tries to be better than others.

In all case this mean that there is a high level of security.

2

Using "plus" sounds to me that it is a bit more emphasized.

Both "plus" and "aussi" in that sentence would express that the security controls are very rigorous, however, telling me that:

Le 1er aéroport a des contrôles de sécurité tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres.

And

Le 2nd aéroport a des contrôles de sécurité tous aussi rigoureux les uns que les autres

I would understand that both airports' security is excellent but I would say it is slightly better for the first one.

In conclusion, there's a little difference between these constructions and the "aussi" form doesn't remove the hyperbolic nature of the expression.

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