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I came across this question

How to translate “By the way”? — Comment traduire « By the way » ?

I wanted to answer it by mentioning "Du coup" but I was not sure. I think it is not mentioned in the given replies.

I know that there are questions about this idiomatic expression like

"Du coup" : Origine, registre et façons de l'éviter

Usage of “du coup”

But I am quite sure those replies don't talk about the (possible) rendering of "by the way" by "du coup".

So, is there any relation at all? If yes, can you provide me a couple of examples of usage?

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You can't render "du coup" by "by the way"! It's an expression that is used to introduce a comment or a question that is not directly related to what you have been talking about (in the words of an Oxford dictionary), or as very aptly put in this answer, a subject shifter; on the other hand "du coup" implies a direct connection to the subject. The solid translations of "by the way" (au fait, à propos) are no synonyms of "du coup".

  • "By the way" can be used to switch to a related subject. But "du coup" implies a consequence so indeed can't be used as a translation. – Laurent S. Jul 24 at 7:56
  • @LaurentS. It seems that the relation can never be direct; in the words of another dictionary: incidentally, in passing, as a side topic, as a casual remark. As I see it, this will not do: "— Depardieu is complaining about taxation, yes, but not without grounds. — By the way, Johnny Halliday does too.". The topic put forward in the reply is directly related (iow related) and "by the way" caracterises it wrongly. If it had been "— By the way, Johnny Halliday as well is deserting Europe. — Not avowedly for the same reason, though.", then the expression would appear to be properly used. – LPH Jul 24 at 9:00

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