5

We were talking about ... My girlfriend whipped up a mousse-like cold dessert with some fresh fruits, but the thick slices of apple inside turned out a bit too frozen to eat as is. And here I wanted to jokingly say something along the lines of:

If somebody cracked a tooth on one of those frozen solid apples, we would never hear the end of it!


In French, I would have expressed the idea as:

Si quelqu’un se casse une dent sur une de ces pommes, on n’a pas fini d’en entendre parler !

But then again, I wonder why we use the perfect tense "n’a pas fini" here, even though we are talking about some likely ensuing complaints that will keep haunting us for a long time to come (in the future).

Is it because, when we use this phrasing, the complaints are expected to die down sooner or later, even if it's not just yet? If so, can I see this construction as:

Si quelqu’un se casse une dent sur une de ces pommes, on n’a pas (encore) fini d’en entendre parler (pour le moment, au moins) !

Is it odd in French to use future tense in this instance?


To express this idea idiomatically in German, for instance, we still use futur-ish tense, as in:

Wenn sich jemand an einem dieser stocksteif gefrorenen Äpfel einen Zahn ausbeißt, dürfen wir uns noch in zehn Jahren die Beschwerden anhören !

≈ We might as well still be hearing some complaint or other in ten years' time.

  • 2
    Si quelqu'un se casse une dent sur une de ces pommes, on ne finira pas d'en entendre parler me semble tout à fait possible, même si moi je préfère : Si quelqu'un se cassait une dent sur une de ces pommes, on ne finirait pas d'en entendre parler – Laure Aug 11 at 7:41
  • @Laure Funny thing, somehow my girlfriend (bilingually native) says, too, that she won't use the future "on ne finira pas" in this specific instance. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 11 at 9:14
  • 2
    I would. Et on peut encore plus souvent me semble-t-il avoir le futur antérieur que le futur simple .... on n'aura pas fini d'en entendre parler. Et pour rapprocher de ta phrase en allemand avec in zehn Jahren, c'est sûr qu'on dirait on en entendra encore parler dans dix ans. Ou ... on n'aura pas fini d'en entendre parler dans dix ans. – Laure Aug 11 at 9:15
  • 1
    @Laure Exactly. Under normal circumstances, I'd indeed be tempted to use "on n'aura pas fini" (which seems more logical), but not in this specific phrasing. I get the impression that there's more to it than meets the eye -- perhaps is it more about a fixed expression at work here? – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 11 at 9:26
  • 1
    Je préfère également "On n'a pas fini ...", plus usuel que "on ne finira pas ...". Je n'ai jamais entendu cette deuxième expression même si elle est sans doute correcte. Une autre possibilité est "on en entendra parler pendant des lustres". – Damien Aug 11 at 10:59
2

The expression on n’a pas fini de +<verbe> is equivalent to on va continuer à +<verbe>, so to on continuera de +<verbe>.

This passé composé starts in the past but includes both the present and a large part of future.

Furthermore, the présent is often used instead of the future in the main phrase of expressions in the form of "si condition, proposition" », e.g. :

Si tu viens demain, je ferai un gâteau.

Si tu viens demain, je fais un gâteau. (very common, despite violating the concordance des temps)

Therefore, it is not a surprise to observe the idiom on a pas fini d'en entendre parler which describes something that last where a present is common.


L'expression on n’a pas fini de +<verbe> est équivalente à on va continuer à +<verbe> et donc à on continuera de +<verbe>.

Ce passé composé débute bien dans le passé mais inclus le présent et une composante forte de futur.

D'autre part, le présent est souvent utilisé à la place du futur dans la proposition principale des expressions du type « si condition, proposition », par exemple :

Si tu viens demain, je ferai un gâteau.

Si tu viens demain, je fais un gâteau. (très courant, bien que ne respectant pas la concordance des temps)

Il n'est donc pas surprenant d'observer la locution on a pas fini d'en entendre parler qui décrit une action qui s'étale dans le temps là où un présent est courant.


Examples from the web:

foot01.com

Si Caen ne parvient pas à se sauver, on n'a pas fini d'en entendre parler...

comment #1:

Et si, en dernière instance, RBR se retrouve avec un Dacia, on a pas fini d’en entendre parler !

comment #2

Si la qualité est là on a pas fini d'en entendre parler.

comment #3

S'il marque contre l'Espagne, on a pas fini d'en entendre parler.

Note the very common mistake on a pas vs on n'a pas in the last occurrences.

  • Excellent. Your 1st sentence says it all ! What a rare sight, though, to see you guys' opinions so split, even among natives. – Con-gras-tue-les-chiens Aug 14 at 8:30
-1

I struggle to answer this question with anything other than “we don't”. To me, “?Si …, on n’a pas fini d’en entendre parler !” is simply wrong. It's perfectly comprehensible, of course, but it sounds off because the tenses don't match.

I would say “Si …, on va pas finir d'en entendre parler” in day-to-day conversation, or more formally “Si …, on ne finira pas d'en entendre parler”.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.