1

I read an example of plus-que-parfait shown below but I am wondering if it is the correct usage:

Il avait pu penser qu'il aidait les gens à réaliser des choses incroyables, mais beaucoup de personnes n'ont pas aimé sa manière.

I thought the plus-que-parfait tense was used to indicate something that happened before another related action. I guess you could argue that he thought before people did not like his methods but I don’t really understand the usage here.

1

That is really a case of use to show anteriority as you have learnt; the usage is called "emploi temporel" as opposed to "emploi modal" and it is described in the Free Encyclopedia.

Dans un récit dont le temps de narration est au passé simple ou au passé composé , il exprime un procès achevé avant le début de celui exprimé par le verbe au temps de narration auquel il se rattache.

In English this says that in a story told by means of the "passé simple" or the "passé composé", the "plus que parfait" is used to express actions or states that have ended before the time of the beginning of the action expressed by the story telling verb, that is the verb in the "passé simple" or in the "passé composé".

  • Il ouvrit la porte. Il avait éteint la télé avant de sortir mais elle marchait maintenant. Quelqu’un était entré en son absence!
  • J’avais marché longtemps, alors je me suis assise sur un banc.

In the sentence the tense used for the narration is the "passé composé" (n'ont pas aimé). Applying the principle to the sentence, we have that the possibility of thinking he was helping people might have been true until the time when people started not liking his method.

What is throwing you off is possibly the word "mais" and other such words but that is immaterial.

  • Quand je suis arrivé à l'école, les cours avaient déjà commencé.
    Je suis arrivé à l'école, les cours avaient déjà commencé.

  • J'avais fait un gâteau pour le dîner mais je l'ai fait tomber.
    J'ai fait tomber le gâteau, celui que j'avais fait pour le diner.

  • J’avais marché longtemps, alors je me suis assise sur un banc.
    J'avais marché longtemps, je mes suis assise sur un banc.

Moreover, there can be two actions before which the action of the verb in the "plus que parfait" must end and the tenses may be different (réf.); here is an example taken from that web page.

  • Pendant que j'attendais Pierre, j'ai parlé à une personne que j'avais rencontrée hier.

anteriority to the simultaneous actions expressed by "attendre" and "parler"

  • Il ouvrit la porte. Il avait éteint la télé avant de sortir mais elle marchait maintenant. Quelqu’un était entré en son absence! (Free encyclopedia)

anteriority of "éteindre" to the actions expressed by "ouvrir" and "marcher" (Note that the anteriority of "éteindre" to the action of "entrer" has nothing to do with tense, those being the same, but is a simple logical deduction.)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you so much, I did not expect this level of detail! – Simon Nicholls Jan 14 at 10:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.