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En lisant des mèmes en ligne, je trouve qu'ils utilisent souvent des infinitifs au lieu de verbes conjugués. Voici quelques exemples :

Quand tu vouloir faire le sortir dehors / mais devoir de garder secret identité

Quoi faire tu vouloir pour ton anniversaire ? Je pas savoir, surprise moi ?

Ce être cinq urinals [avec image de cinq urinals]

On retrouve à chaque fois le même usage de l'infinitif donc je pense que ce doit être de l'argot.

Mes questions : est-ce qu'on trouve ce genre d'argot seulement en ligne ou aussi dans le discours verbal ? Est-ce qu'il y a une bonne ressource qui pourrait m'expliquer toutes les règles de ce genre d'argot ?


When reading memes online, I often find that they use infinitives instead of conjugated verbs. Here are some examples :

Quand tu vouloir faire le sortir dehors / mais devoir de garder secret identité [When you want to go out / but you have to guard your secret identity]

Quoi faire tu vouloir pour ton anniversaire ? Je pas savoir, surprise moi ? [What do you want for your birthday? I don't know, surprise me?]

Ce être cinq urinals [These are five urinals]

The usage is very consistent, so I think it must be slang.

My questions: Do we find this type of slang only online or also in verbal discourse? Is there a good resource that could explain all the rules of this type of slang to me?

  • 3
    Can you provide some source about this kind of meme? They don't look like any kind of slang used in French, – jlliagre Feb 27 at 6:44
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This is a shitposting trend that consists in translating memes literally. It can be funny because sentences make no sense but you can still "reverse translate" back to the original meaning. Translations are often intentionally wrong in the context of the sentence (or just plain wrong sometimes), like échelles for "scales", atterissage for "land" and plombant for "leading" in the example. Here's an example for anyone who has never seen one.

It's not especially about infinitives, that's just a consequence of English having almost no conjugation. Messing up with phrasal verb is also very common (like réveille haut (wake up) or obtenir dehors (get out) for example).

It's very localized and it's not based on any slang that exists outside of the internet. Well, jokes based on literal, innacurate translations of English have been a thing for a while, but you couldn't say it's any from of slang.

And it's a meme thing, so it's basically "you either get it or you don't". Because of that, I highly doubt there's any resources about it online.

| improve this answer | |
  • The meme group I was looking at was specifically about "translated memes" so this makes a lot of sense. This is a good explanation. – D Coetzee Feb 27 at 16:50
  • Définition de shitpost. – user19187 Feb 27 at 18:27

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