2

Just looking for the closest translation to the usage of 'gotta say' or 'I gotta say' in English. It's hard to explain the usage, so I'll just use it in an example sentence in both languages. Closed description I would have is just its used to note that its just used to emphasise that the speaker found a certain thing notable.

English: They really only speak English here, and with a bit of a weird accent, gotta say.

Proposed translation into French: Ils ne parlent vraiment que l'anglais ici, et avec un accent bizarre, (gotta say).

Here's another with the usage at the front.

English: I gotta say, I was really impressed by the level of professionalism.

Proposed translation into French: (I gotta say,) j’étais vraiment impressionné par le niveau de professionnalisme.

Any ideas? Merci d'avance (:

  • /Je [ dois dire | dirais | tiens à dire | vous dirais ] que/ Franchement / Pour ma part / … j'ai été très impressionné par le niveau de professionnalisme. (en italique les propositions de DeepL) – Personne Apr 11 at 16:24
  • … et avec un accent un peu bizarre, je [ me ( dois/permets) de | tiens à ] le dire . – Personne Apr 11 at 16:32
  • … et avec un accent un peu bizarre, pour ainsi dire – Personne Apr 11 at 18:28
1

The way I understand the context of your sentences, your expression sounds equivalent to "actually", with something more personal to it. It sounds like the person expected something to be a certain way, and it turned out to be different. So they want to emphasize this observation, while still questioning themselves about it.

In my opinion, the closest answer here might be the most literal translation: "je dois dire".

Ils ne parlent que l'anglais ici, et avec un accent bizarre, je dois dire.

Je dois dire, j'étais vraiment impressionné par leur niveau de professionnalisme.

I also like "à vrai dire", or "en vérité".

Je dois dire qu'après avoir lu ces réponses, je me suis beaucoup questionné, mais en vérité, la meilleure solution est parfois la plus simple...

PS: personally, I would naturally pronounce it "j'dois dire", making it sound a bit more colloquial.

| improve this answer | |
0

You could probably translate this literally with

J'veux dire, euh

| improve this answer | |
0

In addition to the already suggested translations by Bazin and Personne, a recent trend in young generation colloquial French is to use avouer with this new meaning:

Ils parlent qu'anglais ici, et avec un accent chelou, j'avoue.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can use « franchement » to reinforce what you're saying:

« En fait, ils parlent seulement anglais ici, mais, franchement, ils ont un drôle d'accent. »

« Franchement, j'ai été vraiment impressionné par leur professionnalisme. »

| improve this answer | |
0

Considering "gotta say" is not academic but quite colloquial, the French equivalent expression can be "il faut dire", often degraded into "faut dire"("il" is elided), or "y faut dire" ("il" is replaced by "y"), or "j'veux dire" (the "e" of "je" is elided):

"Ils ne parlent vraiment que l'anglais ici, et avec un accent bizarre, faut dire."

"Ils ne parlent vraiment que l'anglais ici, et avec un accent bizarre, j'veux dire."

"Il faut dire que j’étais vraiment impressionné par le niveau de professionnalisme."

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.