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I am translating a text and the whole idea is:

A student is late for his class and he starts making up a story about a werewolf (loup-garou) chasing him and when the teacher gets bored he shouts, imitating the sound of a wolf:"Toi, la prochaine fois, je ne te louperai pas!"

Which I think should be a joke because un loup is a wolf, how would you translate it?

Also could you please explain there is such a phrase: J'ai eu une de ces trouilles, why does he use this instead of simply saying J'ai eu la trouille , what's the difference in translation?

Thanks

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    Just one question per post, please. And the first one isn't really on topic — looks like you understand the pun, but translating it is more an exercise in English ingenuity than in knowing anything about French. But just for fun: if he met a werewolf, the teacher could say, "And where was this wolf?" or "My patience is wearing thin!" or "Next time we'll see who wears the pants!" Or if you change the mythical beast for a dragon: "Just watch out if I catch you draggin' your feet again!" – Luke Sawczak May 8 at 11:59
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Also could you please explain there is such a phrase: J'ai eu une de ces trouilles, why does he use this instead of simply saying J'ai eu la trouille , what's the difference in translation?

The un/une used in this context is for adding a strong emotion related to the event. Other exemples would be; ref
- J'avais un de ces mal de tête.
- J'ai hâte d'arriver au restaurant; j'ai une de ces faims!

Dans la langue courante, plus particulièrement dans les phrases exclamatives, on fait parfois précéder un nom de la construction un de ces ou une de ces pour indiquer une grande intensité. Généralement, on met ce nom au pluriel, et ce, même s'il n'est pas dénombrable.

he shouts, imitating the sound of a wolf:"Toi, la prochaine fois, je ne te louperai pas!"

For that part it's a good pun your teacher did IMO, as it's the verb louper, which means the next time he will not get away. It's a clear warning to the student and at the same time he used a verb that sounded like loup.

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