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I see the words "extrudeur" and "extrudeuse" used to describe very similar equipment, typically both corresponding to "extruder" in English. One of my 3D printer instructions lists the specs as follows:

Type d’extrudeur: Extrudeuse

There must be a nuance although dictionaries have similar definitions for both. What is the difference between "un extrudeur" and "une extrudeuse"?

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It's a weird thing about French where both -eur and -euse are found for tools, but there is a distinction in their use (although I really wouldn't be able to speculate on the etymological origins!): a word in -eur for an object is generally going to be for something that is more-or-less hand-operated, that is a tool or instrument, but a word in -euse is likely going to be powered, some sort machine. A batteur à oeuf is an eggbeater, but a batteuse (e.g. in moisonneuse-batteuse) is a threshing machine.

For the particular situation you ran into, it's completely impossible to tell what's going on without seeing what I assume is an English original formulation that got mangled in translation (not an uncommon situation!).

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  • Now that you mention it, I think I have seen extrudeuse used for bigger-scale, more industrial contexts. Maybe. – BetterSense Jun 13 at 5:27

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