3

My question is the following: can mis à part be used both for expressing "inclusion" and "exclusion" as is the case with the english apart from. What I mean is that in English it would be possible to say both:

Inclusion: Apart from Germany, they also visited Italy and Austria

Exclusion: Apart from Friday, I'll be in London during the whole week

But what about in French? Would it be correct to say:

Mis à part l'Allemagne, ils ont aussi visité l'Italie et l'Autriche (meaning that they visited both Germany, Italy and Austria)?

Mis à part vendredi, je serai à Londres pendant toute la semaine (meaning that except for Friday, I will be in London)

  • Nice scope of question and explanation of the problem. – Luke Sawczak Jul 1 at 16:18
2

Yes, mis à part or just à part are usable in both contexts.

Should you want to insist on the inclusive or exclusive status:

En plus de l'Allemagne, ils ont aussi visité l'Italie et l'Autriche

Je serai à Londres toute la semaine sauf vendredi.
À l'exclusion de vendredi, je serai à Londres toute la semaine.

| improve this answer | |
3

Native speaker. Yes, you can use the expression mis à part to convey either inclusion or exlusion in French just like you do in English.

Examples of inclusion:

Mis à part le risotto, avez vous d'autres plats végétariens au menu?

Mis à part Sophie qui a déjà demandé un croissant, qui d'autre veut un croissant?

Examples of exclusion:

Mis à part le risotto qui est végétarien, tous nos plats contiennent de la viande.

Mis à part Sophie qui n'a pas faim, tous les enfants veulent un croissant.

Back to your example, Mis à part l'Allemagne, ils ont aussi visité l'Italie et l'Autriche , the word "aussi" gives it the inclusive meaning, which is usually reinforced by context:

En Allemagne ils ont vu Berlin, la Forêt Noire et le lac de Constance. Mis à part l'Allemagne, ils ont aussi visité l'Italie et l'Autriche.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.