3

I understand that for the sentence “The boys are unrelated.” we can say

(a) Les garçons n’ont pas de liens de parenté.

(b) Les garçon n’ont aucun lien de parenté.

(c) Les garçons ne sont pas parents.

But my questions are,

  1. can we also say

(d) Les garçons sont sans lien de parenté.

  1. Is (b) a stronger statement than (a) ?

As these are simple questions, all I require is a simple yes or no. Thank you for your help. 😊✌🏽

  • 1
    — (d) qui est correct et plutôt formel (langage des notaires) peut se dire : « Les garçons ne sont pas de la même famille. » ou « Les garçons sont nés dans deux familles différentes. » – Personne Oct 28 at 21:45
  • «Les garçons ne sont pas apparentés» would be the most common way to state the fact in Quebec. Apparently that wouldn't sound as natural in Belgium though. – Pas un clue Oct 30 at 14:06
6

a and b mean the same, there is no difference.

d is understood but not really idiomatic - a and b are better, using "avoir un lien de parenté"

c is ambiguous: depending on the context, it can also mean that the two boys do not have any children.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your help @Greg ! This was really helpful !!!😊 – Noybwbh Oct 28 at 15:11
  • (1) For the sentence “I’m unrelated to sb.”, I know that I can say « Je suis sans lien de parenté avec qn. » But can I also « Je n’ai pas de lien de parenté avec qn. » ? – Noybwbh Oct 28 at 15:14
  • (2) Also is it « Les garçons n’ont pas de lienS de parenté. »** or is it « Les garçons n’ont pas de lien de parenté. » ? Again, thank you for your help! 😊 – Noybwbh Oct 28 at 15:17
  • (1) yes "je n'ai pas de lien de parenté avec cette personne" is perfect (2) good catch ! The rule in such a case is to see if the affirmative sentence has a singular or plural. The affirmative sentence is "les garçons ont un lien de parenté": "un lien" is singular => the negation is "les garçons n'ont pas de lien de parenté" – Greg Oct 28 at 16:25
  • Thank you so much for your help @Greg !!!😊 – Noybwbh Oct 28 at 17:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.