2

Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, professeur elle aussi.

I don't understand why did the word "professeur" come before the subject and adverb "aussi".

I try to translate it in English and it's just so weird:

... ,teacher she also.

Is this a typical grammar structure with the adverb "aussi"? If so does this have a name?

1
  • 1
    it is only because it is nicer when said orally.
    – mh-cbon
    Dec 12 '20 at 21:08
1

There are various ways to write this, all equivalent as to their meaning. I don't think there is anything special about the adverb.

  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, professeur elle aussi.
  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, elle aussi professeur.
  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, elle aussi est professeur.
  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, qui est elle aussi professeur.
  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, qui elle aussi est professeur.
  • Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, qui est professeur elle aussi.

The short forms can be considered to be ellipted forms obtained from a longer one. In the third case the two clauses are connected without coordination word, just a comma (parataxis).

  • Pierre est souvent malade… Pierre a un ami, Paul, de même souvent malade.
  • Pierre est souvent malade… Pierre a un ami, Paul, souvent malade, de même.
2
  • Pouvons nous utiliser aussi : Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, dont le metier est professeur aussi
    – user25798
    Dec 12 '20 at 22:50
  • 1
    @SkyLand77 C'est une option qui est tout aussi valable.
    – LPH
    Dec 13 '20 at 7:18
5

Word by word translation can be helpful but rarely gives a proper sentence.

Here is a rare case where English uses an article while French doesn't.

Another point, aussi, being after the noun better translates to too or as well instead of also

A better translation of "professeur elle aussi" is then:

a teacher too.

Like in English, we can reverse the order of the words that way:

elle aussi professeur: also a teacher

The pronoun elle is optional in the first form and is clarifying or emphasizing who this is about. It is not a subject pronoun but a tonic one so would translate to "her", not "she" so the the literal translation to English would be more like:

Mon père est professeur...Mon père a une sœur, Marie, ma tante, professeur elle aussi.

My father is a teacher... My father has a sister, Marie, my aunt, a teacher (her) too.

Here elle aussi is built like

  • moi aussi (me too)
  • toi/vous aussi (you too)
  • lui aussi (him too)
  • nous aussi (us too)
  • eux aussi/elles aussi (them too).

I guess "my aunt, also a teacher" would be the most common way to say it in English.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.