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What is the French word for “cuteness"?

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    If you believe random words can be translated from one language to another without taking any context into account, you are very much mistaken.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 9 at 23:59
  • Words rarely have "official translations". Words expressing concepts have no magic property either that would free them to require a context to be properly translated. Moreover, a very clear definition in one language doesn't mean it would be equally clear in another.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 10 at 0:43
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    The other way around. Mignon has mignonnesse which is "official" according to your definition because mentioned in several dictionaries (e.g. Littré, TFLi) but it would be a poor translation of "cuteness" because while the English word is common, the French one is so rare that it would be considered improper and unsuitable by most native speakers.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 10 at 7:02
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    I've cleaned up the comments a bit. I left a few that I think were somewhat useful. I think the different points have been made sufficiently.
    – Luke Sawczak
    Apr 10 at 19:28
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    @Perplexed By the way, you are welcome to visit our French Language Chat which is more suitable for discussions like the one we just had than comments.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 10 at 21:20
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"Mignon" is the translation for "Cute", but cuteness doesn't really have one.

You can either use made up words like "Mignonnerie".

Or you can say that it is cute. "C'est mignon." "C'est trop chou !"

But it might be different from what you need depending on the context in which you want to use this. Did you have a particular sentence or idea in mind ?

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  • @Perplexed Then as stated in my answer, there is no literal translation as far as I know, aside from made up words.
    – Zekovski
    Apr 10 at 14:59
  • In this context you can replace "cuteness" with made up words given here by people or by myself. Or you can replace it with "être mignon" which makes it a tautology.
    – Zekovski
    Apr 10 at 15:22
  • La définition de la qualité d'être mignon, c'est sa condition.
    – Lambie
    Apr 10 at 19:24
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    Mignonnerie and for that matter the better mignonnesse are not made up words, assuming words listed in a dictionary are not.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 10 at 21:13
  • Seems like it is a difficult subject because I can't find them in the online Larousse. larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/Mignonnerie What is the dictionary you use on your website ? I'd like to know why it is in there and not elsewhere. (The Académie ones below don't seem to have them either.)
    – Zekovski
    Apr 11 at 16:36
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I think "mignonnerie" is a possible translation but it not a word really used in French.

I probably would translate it by "côté mignon".

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  • Mignonnesse would probably be closer than mignonnerie, although equally rare.
    – jlliagre
    Apr 10 at 0:00