1

In an article from RFI, I saw the following sentence:

Le conflit en est aujourd'hui à son quatrième jour.

I would have expected this to say either Le conflit est aujourd'hui à son quatrième jour or Le conflit est aujourd'hui en son quatrième jour. I'm not sure which is correct but I would have guessed one of them. But both together? That confuses me. Can anyone explain the role of en in this sentence? It seems like it's a pronoun but I don't know what it's there for. I thought en as a pronoun was only when de was involved.

If context helps, here it is with the preceding sentence:

Israël a, par ailleurs, déployé des chars et des blindés le long de la frontière avec l'enclave palestinienne de Gaza. Le conflit en est aujourd'hui à son quatrième jour.

4

Neither le conflit est aujourd'hui à son quatrième jour nor le conflit est aujourd'hui en son quatrième jour are idiomatic. What might have been written is le conflit est aujourd'hui dans son quatrième jour.

The sentence you read uses the en être à construction which has already been discussed here: Elle n’en est pas à son premier geste - what do "elle" and "en" here refer to?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.