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The following was taken from the (non-auto-generated) subtitles of a Québecois TV show:

Régulièrement, des cas de conférences perturbées ou annulées font les manchettes, et à ça s'ajoutent des dénonciations de profs et d'élèves qui se disent intimidés parce que leurs discours qui ne s'inscrivent pas dans certains consensus qui règnent dans le milieu universitaire, plus particulièrement dans les sciences sociales.

Everything in italics looks like a noun-phrase to me. DeepL translates the stuff after "parce que" with a finite clause:

Regularly, cases of disrupted or cancelled conferences make the headlines, and to this are added denunciations of professors and students who say they are intimidated because their speeches do not fit in with certain consensuses that prevail in the academic world, more particularly in the social sciences.

You could avoid including a finite clause with the English translation, by saying "because of their speeches which do not fit in ..". Is this what the original is doing with "parce que"?

Can a noun phrase, instead of a finite clause, follow "parce que" in French?

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Parce que” is always followed by a clause with a verb in standard French. I'm not aware of any difference in Québec French compared to France French.

There is a somewhat uncommon colloquial usage where “parce que” can be followed by a noun or a short noun clause. This is very similar to what can happen in English with “because”. I mention this for completeness, but even in colloquial speech, it's uncommon.

Il arrive souvent en retard, parce que métro.   (He's often late, because subway.)

The sentence you quoted is a mistake (either in the transcription into subtitles, or in the actor's lines, or in the screenplay). It's probably a confusion or slippage between two almost equivalent ways to phrase the same idea, one with a verb clause (“because their speeches do not fit”) and one with a noun clause:

Régulièrement, des cas de conférences perturbées ou annulées font les manchettes, et à ça s'ajoutent des dénonciations de profs et d'élèves qui se disent intimidés parce que leurs discours ne s'inscrivent pas dans certains consensus qui règnent dans le milieu universitaire, plus particulièrement dans les sciences sociales.

Régulièrement, des cas de conférences perturbées ou annulées font les manchettes, et à ça s'ajoutent des dénonciations de profs et d'élèves qui se disent intimidés à cause de leurs discours qui ne s'inscrivent pas dans certains consensus qui règnent dans le milieu universitaire, plus particulièrement dans les sciences sociales.

This slippage may be made more likely by the fact that in Québec French, “à cause que” is still used where standard French today demands “parce que”, at least in colloquial speech (which this sentence is not).

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    I wouldn't be surprised if the author made this mistake because his sentence which is so long that he forgot how he had started it. – Didier L Jul 19 at 17:41
  • I'll be willing to wager that the script was written with à cause de leurs discours but an producer/editor requested the change to parce que in order to make the text a bit more "international french". In changing it, the long sentence caused the resulting error to be missed. – Jeffrey Jul 19 at 20:04
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    @MichaelSeifert "à cause que" doesn't exist. I was reading this answer and want to emphasize that it's more than uncommon even in colloquial speech. If someone told me "parce que métro", I would assume French is not his mother language. – Shautieh Jul 19 at 20:38
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    @Shautieh À cause que very much existed, and still does. Parce que + substantive is definitely used by native French. e.g. Jusqu'ici, on a fait au moins un point par mois pour tenir au courant de l'avancée du chantier, exception faite d'août (parce que vacances) et donc décembre (parce qu'on attendait des infos). ulule – jlliagre Jul 20 at 15:56
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    @Shautieh To add to jlliagre's comment parce que + noun is a case where part of a sentence is omitted because the meaning is obvious. Quite frequent in colloquial French : préparer un truc rapide à manger parce que grosse fatigue, Parce que ras-le-bol de leur course à l'Audimat, lots of examples available. – None Jul 20 at 16:15

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